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What is the epistemological role of memory?IntroductionIt is widely accepted that memory works to retain and reproduce impressions onceperceived. Epistemologists approach memory through correlation with sources of knowledge,including perception, inference, and testimony. Testimony can be conceived as a routine basis foracquiring no demonstrative knowledge. Epistemology of testimony focuses on the debatebetween anti-reductionism and reductionism to justify testimony-based beliefs. Perception,memory, and inference, however, are powerful epistemic capacities that generate knowledge. Theepistemology of memory focuses on the role of memory in knowledge acquisition andjustification.Epistemology of MemoryMemory plays a vital role in cognition by actively presenting the past to make sense ofthe future. Nearly everything that we believe at any particular time, whether correctly orincorrectly, depends on memory. Not surprisingly, one cannot survive without memory. While weknow the central role of memory in our lives, making sense of its epistemic role has provedchallenging. Theories of memory endorse the depiction of memory, for which rememberingevents consists of conjuring mental images or content, similar to one that was initially producedat an early stage through perception. Meanwhile, memories also integrate information from othersources attributed to perceived actual events upon retrieval. Studies concerning memory havefocused on the relation between imagination and memory, with a specific interest in theconnection between imagination and memory with experimental characteristics. Experimentalmemory consists of the memory of the past object and the previous perception.According to Huemer (1999), memory cannot be recovered from a previous experience ifit has not been retained. From this perspective, a person can only remember something that theyhave experienced in person. Propositional memory holds the view of a true proposition or fact.Essentially, propositions are considered abstract objects often perceived as the primary bearers oftruth-value and belief content. Based on this supposition, the propositional memory is associatedwith the belief of facts, often termed as remembering. Unlike experimental memory,propositional memory does not limit itself to experience or imagination; that is, an individual isnot limited to what has been perceived from personal experience. Practical memory involvesrecalling how to do something, wherein something is a previously acquired skill. Everyday self-
observation indicates that we can and often re-collectively remember events and objects and useour sensory imagination to visualize objects and events.Epistemology of TestimonyAccording to Coady (1992), testimony can be conceived as a routine basis for acquiringnon-demonstrative knowledge. The normative process, however, involves a dramatic shift in theway testimony is conceived. Although the medial concept of knowledge asepistemeleads to the

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Term
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Epistemology, Lackey J

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