ism_ch02 - Chapter 2 One-Dimensional Kinematics Answers to...

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Chapter 2 One-Dimensional Kinematics Answers to Even-numbered Conceptual Questions 2. An odometer measures the distance traveled by a car. You can tell this by the fact that an odometer has a nonzero reading after a round trip. 4. No. After one complete orbit the astronaut’s displacement is zero. The distance traveled, however, is roughly 25,000 miles. 6. A speedometer measures speed, not velocity. For example, if you drive with constant speed in a circular path your speedometer maintains the same reading, even though your velocity is constantly changing. 8. Yes. For example, your friends might have backed out of a parking place at some point in the trip, giving a negative velocity for a short time. 10. No. If you throw a ball upward, for example, you might choose the release point to be y = 0. This doesn’t change the fact that the initial upward speed is nonzero. 12. Bow B gives the greater acceleration. It accelerates the arrow to the same speed as bow A, but in a shorter distance. 14. (a) Yes. The object might simply be at rest. (b) Yes. An example would be a ball thrown straight upward; at the top of its trajectory its velocity is zero, but it has a nonzero acceleration downward. 16. Yes. A ball thrown straight upward and caught when it returns to its release point has zero average velocity, but it has been accelerating the entire time. 18. When she returns to her original position, her speed is the same as it was initially; that is, 4.5 m/s. 20. (a) No. Displacement is the change in position, and therefore it is independent of the location chosen for the origin. (b) Yes. In order to know whether an object’s displacement is positive or negative, we need to know which direction has been chosen to be positive. 22. (ii) The balls have the same speed just before they land because they both have the same downward speed when they are at the level of the roof. Ball B simply starts off with the speed v 0 downward. Ball A travels upward initially, but when it returns to the level of the roof it is moving downward with the speed v 0 , just like ball B. Solutions to Problems 1. (a) distance 0.75 mi 0.60 mi 0.60 mi 1.95 mi += =+ (b) fi 0.75 mi 0 0.75 mi xx x ∆= − = 7
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Chapter 2: One-Dimensional Kinematics Physics: An Introduction 2. (a) distance 0.60 mi 0.35 mi 0.35 mi 0.60 mi 0.75 mi 2.65 mi =++++= (b) fi 0.75 mi 0 0.75 mi xx x ∆= − =− 3. (a) (b) 10 m 0 10 m − = 4. (a) 5 m 0 5 m (b) 5 m 7 m 2 m =− 5. (a) 30 30 stance m 100 m m 130 m 22 =++= di 100 m 0 100 m (b) di stance 2(130 m) 260 m == 00 0 ∆= − =−= 6. (a) 2 Cr π = 1 (5.0 m) 16 m 2 ππ === = distance 2 xr 2(5.0 m) 10 m = = (b) (c) ( 5 . 0 m ) 3 1 m = The displacement is 0 since the child and pony have returned to the same place. 7. av 200 m 10.13 m 3600 s 1 mi 10.1 m/s 22.7 mi/h 19.75 s s h 1609 m d s t  = = =   8. av 100 m 1.83 m 3600 s 1 mi 1.83 m/s 4.09 mi/h 54.64 s s h 1609 m d s t   = = =     9. av 65 km 1 h (2 min) 2.2 km h6 0 m i n ds t    =       8
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Physics: An Introduction Chapter 2: One-Dimensional Kinematics 10.
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHYS 105 taught by Professor Klie during the Spring '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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ism_ch02 - Chapter 2 One-Dimensional Kinematics Answers to...

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