lab9 - PHY 241 University Physics Experiment 9 The Simple...

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PHY 241 University Physics Experiment 9 The Simple Pendulum Jacob Matson Lab Partner: Chip Pitkin Performed: Mar 23 2006 Submitted: Mar 30 2006
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Objective: To study the parameters affecting the period of a simple pendulum and to use a simple pendulum to determine the acceleration of gravity. Apparatus: Pendulum clamp and support, metallic pendulum bob, dual cords, photogate timer apparatus with computer interface, meter stick with caliper jaws. Theory: A simple pendulum is defined as a point mass attached to a massless cord. The period of a simple pendulum is determined by three factors, its amplitude, its length, and the acceleration of gravity. If the amplitude of motion is very small, its period is given by equation 1. When the amplitude is large, the period increases with amplitude in a way that can be approximated by a taylor series expansion as given by equation 2. With this modification, the period of a simple pendulum can be estimated to a fraction of one percent even with an amplitude of 90 degrees. If equation 2 is solved for the acceleration of gravity the resulting formula is equation 3. In fact, for relatively small amplitudes, equation 3 can yield extremely accurate values for the acceleration of gravity (if the mass is small but dense, and if all the sources of friction and air resistance are kept minimal). Experimentally, it is easier to get accurate measurements of the horizontal
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lab9 - PHY 241 University Physics Experiment 9 The Simple...

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