MWH Bolivar DBQ-2.pdf - Essential Question What kind of...

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Essential Question: What kind of leader was Simon Bolivar? Lesson Plan 1. Introduce Lesson: Today we’re going to be talking about Simon Bolivar, who was a military and political figure that played a leading role in Latin America’s struggle for independence. During his lifetime he led Venezuela, Colombia, Panama, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia to independence from the Spanish Empire. Through the idea of Pan-Americanism, he hoped to unite those countries into a single nation similar to the United States. Though he ultimately failed at this, he is remembered as often remembered fondly as the George Washington of Latin America. Today, we seek to take a more in-depth look at this fascinating man, and ask the question “What kind of leader was Simon Bolivar?” Use the documents provided to answer the accompanying questions. Be sure to analyze and interpret each picture or excerpt in a concise historical answer
“El Libertador” (Document A) Source: The following portrait was painted by Tito Salas in 1930. The painting is titled “El Libertador,”which means “The Liberator.”
Proclamation of 1813 (Document B) Source: Venezuela declared its independence from Spain in 1811. However, Spain regained control of the country by July of 1812. Simon Bolivar was chosen to lead an army to drive the Spanish out of Venezuela for a second time. He gave this speech on June 15, 1813 to Venezuelans in the city of Trujillo. An army of our brothers has come to liberate you. We are sent to destroy the Spaniards, to protect the Americans, and to reestablish the republican governments of Venezuela. The states defended by our arms are again governed by their former constitutions, in full enjoyment of their liberty and independence. Our mission is designed only to break the chains of servitude which shackle ( chain up) some of our towns, and not to impose laws or carry out acts of dominion ( conquest) . We have been unable to watch with indifference the afflictions ( hurts) you were forced to experience by the barbarous Spaniards. They have plundered ( robbed) you, and brought you death and destruction. Justice demands vengeance, and necessity requires us to take it. Let the monsters who infest Colombian soil be cast out forever. May their punishment be equal to the size of their perfidy ( treachery) , so that we may demonstrate to the nations of the world that the sons of America cannot be offended without consequences.

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