8 Steps For Conflict Resolution - 8 Steps For Conflict Resolution Overview 1\"Know Thyself and Take Care of Self 2 Clarify Personal Needs Threatened by

8 Steps For Conflict Resolution - 8 Steps For Conflict...

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8 Steps For Conflict Resolution Overview 1. "Know Thyself" and Take Care of Self 2. Clarify Personal Needs Threatened by the Dispute 3. Identify a Safe Place for Negotiation 4. Take a Listening Stance into the Interaction 5. Assert Your Needs Clearly and Specifically 6. Approach Problem-Solving with Flexibility 7. Manage Impasse with Calm, Patience, and Respect 8. Build an Agreement that Works About Conflict What is Conflict? Definitions and Assumptions About Conflict Conflict is Normal: Anticipating Conflicts Likely to Arise in the Workplace Conflict Styles and Their Consequences How we Respond to Conflict: Thoughts, Feelings, and Physical Responses The Role of Perceptions in Conflict Why do we tend to avoid dealing with Conflict? What is Conflict? Definitions and Assumptions About Conflict We define conflict as a disagreement through which the parties involved perceive a threat to their needs, interests or concerns . Within this simple definition there are several important understandings that emerge: Disagreement - Generally, we are aware there is some level of difference in the positions of the two (or more) parties involved in the conflict. But the true disagreement versus the perceived disagreement may be quite different from one another. In fact, conflict tends to be accompanied by significant levels of misunderstanding that exaggerate the perceived disagreement considerably. If we can understand the true areas of disagreement, this will help us solve the right problems and manage the true needs of the parties. Parties involved - There are often disparities in our sense of who is involved in the conflict. Sometimes, people are surprised to learn they are a party to the conflict, while other times we are shocked to learn we are not included in the disagreement. On many occasions, people who are seen as part of the social system (e.g.,
work team, family, company) are influenced to participate in the dispute, whether they would personally define the situation in that way or not. In the above example, people very readily "take sides" based upon current perceptions of the issues, past issues and relationships, roles within the organization, and other factors. The parties involved can become an elusive concept to define. Perceived threat - People respond to the perceived threat, rather than the true threat, facing them. Thus, while perception doesn't become reality per se, people's behaviors, feelings and ongoing responses become modified by that evolving sense of the threat they confront. If we can work to understand the true threat (issues) and develop strategies (solutions) that manage it (agreement), we are acting constructively to manage the conflict.

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