Beng 130 Lecture 6

Beng 130 Lecture 6 - Molecular Motion Kinetic Theory and...

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Molecular Motion Kinetic Theory and Transport Properties Kinetic Theory Kinetic Theory -Brownian±mot ion - Translational kinetic energies Boltzmann and Maxwell Boltzmann and Maxwell -Boltzmann Distributions Boltzmann Distributions - Boltzmann Boltzmann ’s most probable distribution of energies s most probable distribution of energies - Maxwell Maxwell -Boltzmann Boltzmann ’s distribution of velocities s distribution of velocities Diffusion, Sedimentation and Viscosity Diffusion, Sedimentation and Viscosity - Frick Frick ’s laws etc. s laws etc. Molecular Physical Chemistry - Lecture 6&7 Reading: Chapter 6 and Lecture Notes Reading: Kinetic Theory Kinetic Theory Kinetic Theory - Translational kinetic energies Boltzmann and Maxwell Boltzmann and Maxwell -Boltzmann Distributions Boltzmann Distributions - Boltzmann Boltzmann ’s most probable distribution of energies s most probable distribution of energies - Maxwell Maxwell -Boltzmann Boltzmann ’s distribution of velocities s distribution of velocities BENG 130 Lecture 6, 2006 Reading: Chapter 6 and Lecture Notes Reading: Molecular Interactions Are Important in All Processes in Life Molecular and Cellular Architecture: Self assembly into higher-order structures FIGURE 1–11 Structural hierarchy in the molecular organization of cells. In this plant cell, the nucleus is an organelle containing several types of supramolecular complexes, including chromosomes. Chromosomes consist of macromolecules of DNA and many different proteins. Each type of macromolecule is made up of simple subunits— DNA of nucleotides (deoxyribonucleotides), for example. Concentrations of Ions in a Cell
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The Thermodynamic Basis of Transport Processes • Movement of charged/hydrophilic solutes across membranes involves a desolvation process with a very high activation energy. • The activation energy for translocation of a polar solute across the bilayer is so large that pure lipid bilayers are virtually impermeable to polar and charged species. • Transporters are essential for transporting them across the bilayers. Brownian Motion and Kinetic Energies • In the 1820’s, English botanist Robert Brown observed through a microscope the motion of tiny bits of pollen suspended in water. The pollen grains danced randomly like water bugs on water. • The random translational motion seen by Brown is called Brownian Motion, which is the result of collisions between the particles containing thermal energy. • The average translation kinetic energy – energy of motion – depends only on the temperature. Observation of Brownian Motion FRAP: F luorescence R ecovery A fter P hoto-bleaching SPT: Single Particle Tracking • Lipids and proteins can diffuse laterally in the bilayer due to brownian motion.
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This homework help was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BENG 130, 103B, taught by Professor Gough during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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Beng 130 Lecture 6 - Molecular Motion Kinetic Theory and...

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