caseys part - Yellow book chs 22-24 29 38 Ethical Pluralism...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Yellow book chs. 22-24, 29, 38 Ethical Pluralism and Absolute Moral Rules (ch. 15) 1. What is moral absolutism ? What are some considerations in favor of the view that no moral rules are absolute? (think of the trolley and transplant cases) There is one fundamental, supreme rule that serves as the basis of all morality. A) If there are any absolute moral rules, then we are never permitted to break them. B) Every moral rule may be permissibly broken, since doing so may be necessary to prevent a catastrophe. C) Therefore, there are no absolute moral rules. 2. Doctrine of Double Effect (DDE) a. What is the DDE? Provided your goal is worthwhile, you are sometimes permitted to act in ways that foreseeably cause certain types of harm, though you must never intend to cause such harms. b. How is the DDE supposed to help the moral absolutist argue against act consequentialism? (Imagine that the absolutist would like to maintain that it is wrong to sacrifice the one to save the five in the hospital case, but not wrong to sacrifice the one to save the five in the trolley case) In trolley case, harm is foreseen but not intended, unlike the hospital case, where death is intended. c. The plausibility of the DDE depends in part on its ability to distinguish intention from foresight in the right way . How is this a problem? We lack a clear basis for distinguishing between intention and foresight. Either fails to provide guidance or will give us results that seem deeply mistaken. 3. Doctrine of Doing and Allowing (DDA) a. What is the DDA? It is always worse to do harm than to allow that same harm to occur. b. How is the DDA supposed to help the moral absolutist? Directly supports: We are always forbidden to act in certain ways, though we are not always required to prevent such acts from occurring. c. What is one problem for the DDA? Sometimes the difference between doing and allowing has no moral importance. Distinction between doing and allowing is unclear. Meta-ethics (ch.19-21) 1. Ethical Objectivity: The view that some moral claims are objectively true, like scientific claims, regardless of our beliefs or desires. 2. Ethical Skepticism: The denial of objective moral standards. 3. Ethical Nihilism: Morality is make-believe. A complex set of rules and recommendations that represents nothing real. 4. Expressivism: There are no moral features in this world. No moral judgments are true. Moral claims are not attempts to describe the world, so they can’t be false. 5. Error Theory: There are no moral features in this world. No moral judgments are true. Our sincere moral judgments try, but fail, to describe moral features of things. There is no moral knowledge. 6. Two kinds of Ethical Relativism: a. Cultural Relativism: What is morally good, according to cultural relativism?
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern