Attacking and Offense in Volleyball(original)

Attacking and Offense in Volleyball(original) - Alex Dyer...

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Alex Dyer Prof Tuel English 101 03 September 2007 Attacking and Offense in Volleyball Attacking, or “spiking”, is the most efficient and basic form of scoring points in volleyball. All teams utilize it to the fullest extent of their abilities and talents. Throughout this paper, you will be taught the rules of attacking, the basic footsteps and body motions of attacking, the different types of attacks, and different attacks and techniques used in fooling the blockers and scoring points. This paper is written on the assumption that the reader has, at least, a simplistic knowledge of volleyball and how a volleyball court is set up. The goal of this paper is to teach a specific skill in volleyball not to teach the sport as a whole. Attacking in volleyball usually occurs on the third hit after a pass from a passer and a set from a setter. An attacker has few restrictions when attacking but here are a few that occur often when attacking. An attacker may not touch the net with any part of his body at anytime, the only exception to this is that if the ball is hit into the net so hard it touches another person then no violation will be called, doing so will result in the loss of the chance to score and the other team will receiving a point. An attacker may not attack a ball on the other side of the net unless blocking an attack of an opponent, doing so will cause you to lose the chance of scoring and the other team will receive a point. Hitting a ball outside of the antennas on either side will cause the referees to call the ball out of bounds and the other team will receiving the other point. Stepping under the net is another violation common to attackers, doing so will result in loss of play and the other team will receive a point. Hitting the ball out of bounds results in loss of play and the other team will receive a point. One last rule that occurs is an attacker may not palm, throw or catch the ball at anytime doing so will result in the consequences stated in the other rules. An attack in volleyball consists of a few key factors: footwork, body motion, timing, arm swing, placement, and block reading. Beginning with footwork the two most popular forms of approaching the ball are commonly known as the 3-step and 4-step approaches. Depending on your height and your stride 1
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Alex Dyer Prof Tuel English 101 03 September 2007 length, your starting position may vary, in general you want to start a little behind the 10 foot or 3 meter line and take off in the middle of the 10 foot line and the net. A 3-step approach consists of exactly what the name implies an approach with 3 steps. For right handers, you begin with either of your feet slightly
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Rockwell during the Spring '08 term at Sonoma.

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Attacking and Offense in Volleyball(original) - Alex Dyer...

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