Molecular Phylogeny - Kaylee Freese Molecular Phylogeny Monday February 10th Introduction Eight species from the family Cercopithecidae were analyzed in

Molecular Phylogeny - Kaylee Freese Molecular Phylogeny...

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Kaylee Freese Molecular Phylogeny Monday, February 10 th
Introduction Eight species from the family Cercopithecidae were analyzed in this study. Data was compiled from Genebank, a database utilizing the gene sequence of the CO1 gene to hypothesize evolutionary relationships. These species were chosen at random, with two additional species from the sister family Hominidae used to create an out-group to anchor the tree. A tree was created to show possible evolutionary relationships of the eight species chosen. Cercopithecidae, or old world monkeys, have large brains that are convoluted (referring to the “wrinkles”), eye sockets that are fully formed, a rostrum that is somewhat flattened, the lower premolar (P 3 ) is often extended upward which allows for sharpening of the upper canine, which is a large stabbing weapon. The family Cercopithecidae is split up into two subfamilies, which include the Cercopithecinae and the Colobinae. The Colobinae are the leaf-eaters and are more arboreal, whereas the Cercopithecinae are cheek-pouched monkeys and more terrestrial. Cercopithecines have longer faces, whereas Colobines have shorter, more upright faces. The interorbital distance is greater in the Colobines and they have a more upright ramus (ascending portion of the lower jaw). The Cercopithecines have a ramus that is tilted back at a fairly extreme angle. The old world monkeys are found in a range from Africa to Eurasia (Karger 1975). C01 is a 648 base pair region of the cytochrome oxidase 1 gene in DNA of mitochondria. It codes for a protein that is essential in cellular respiration. Since the protein plays an essential part in cellular respiration it is highly conserved across species, which makes it a good gene to look at when comparing species because it changes slowly (University of Waikato 2009).

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