In the three poems written by Lorca he incorporates both traditional Spanish tropes as well as

In the three poems written by Lorca he incorporates both traditional Spanish tropes as well as

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In the three poems written by Lorca he incorporates both traditional Spanish tropes as well as “foreign” influences to explore sexuality and death. To me the most blatant use of foreign and Spanish influence that explores sexuality and death is in the “Ode to Walt Whitman.” “Against you always, Fairies of North America, Pajaros of Havana, Jotos of Mexico, Sarasas of Cadiz, Apios of Seville, Cancos of Madrid, Floras of Alicante, Adelaidas of Portugal. Pansies of the world, murderers of doves!” (578). In this text he uses many colloquial versions of the Spanish word of marcias which is described as being a word which is a negative word for effeminate gay men. Lorca uses dream imagery to portray New York as a decaying wasteland. More profoundly, however, he blames it on the effeminate homosexuals of the city. “That is why I do not raise my voice, aged Walt Whitman, against the little boy who writes a girl’s name on his pillow, nor the boy who dresses himself in the bride’s
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Watt during the Spring '08 term at Ole Miss.

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