Political Science Review #1

Political Science Review #1 - Review Sheet Access...

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Review Sheet Access - _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ___ Adversarial relationship – Politicians use the media to persuade the public to accept their policies. Politicians want the media to act as conduits, conveying their messages, exactly as they deliver them, to the public. But journalists see themselves not as conduits but as servants of the people in a democracy. They examine and question officials and policies so the public can learn more about them. Agenda setting – The power of the media to tell us what to think about rather than what to think. Awareness and Information are the strength of the media (agenda setting). Agents of political socialization – Politics being exposed to new information supplied or filtered through parents, peers, schools, the media, political leaders, and the community. Introduce each new generation to citizenship as well as shape opinions and positions toward officeholders and political issues. Anti-Federalists – Dubbed this by Federalists to imply that their opponents did not want a division of power between the governments. Faulted the constitution for lacking a Bill of Rights. Wary of entrusting power to officials far away. Worried the government would accumulate too much power and the presidency would become a monarchy or congress an aristocracy. Lacked unity on an alternative. Those who opposed the ratification of the US Constitution. Article I – Describes the powers of the Legislative branch of the US government, known as Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. Establishes the manner of election and qualifications of members of each house. Outlines legislative procedure and enumerates the powers vested in the legislative branch. Establishes limits on federal and state legislative powers. Article II – Describes the powers of the Executive branch. Comprised of the President and other executive officers. Article III – Establishes the Judicial branch of the Federal government. The judicial branch comprises the Supreme Court of the United States along with lower federal courts established pursuant to legislation by Congress. Articles of Confederation – The first constitution of the US; in effect from 1781 to 1789. Attentive public - _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ___ Attitudes - _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ___
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Bicameral – Is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. Thus, a bicameral parliament or bicameral legislature which consists of two chambers or houses. Bicameralism is an essential and defining feature of the classical notion of mixed government. Bicameral legislatures tend to require a concurrent majority to pass legislation. Bill of Rights – The first 10 amendments to the US constitution. Block grants – A system of giving federal funds to states and localities under which the Federal government designates the purpose for which the funds are to be used but allows the states some discretion in spending.
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