23 Air Pollution

23 Air Pollution - Air Pollutants airborne substances...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Air pollution Air Pollutants – airborne substances (either solids, liquids, or gases) that occur in concentrations high enough to threaten the health of people and animals, to harm vegetation and structures or toxify a given environment. Two Sources: Natural sources (smoke, dust, ash, pollens, etc) Human activities 1. Fixed sources (power plants, homes, industries, etc) 2. Mobile sources (motor vehicles, ships, aircrafts, etc) Fig. 18-CO, p. 488
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Primary Air Pollutants - Enter the atmosphere directly (smokestacks, tailpipes, etc) Secondary Air Pollutants - Form from a chemical reaction occurs between a primary pollutant and some other component of air, such as water vapor or another pollutant. Fig. 18-1, p. 491
Background image of page 2
Table 18-1, p. 491
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fig. 18-2, p. 492
Background image of page 4
Fig. 18-2a, p. 492
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fig. 18-2b, p. 492
Background image of page 6
Particulate Matter (aerosols) – A group of solid particles and liquid droplets that are small enough to remain suspended in the air (soot, dust, pollen, nickel, iron, copper etc). Health problems associated with these pollutants: 1. Respiratory problems 2. Bone and soft tissue damage 3. Heart problems Fig. 18-3a, p. 493
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Industrial processes (40% of all PMs) Vehicles (17% of all PMs) Particles greater than 10 µm (0.01 mm) tend to settle to the ground. PM-10 – finer particles with diameters smaller than 10 µm. 1. Greatest health risk to lungs 2. Examples (Arctic haze, Asian dust) Fig. 18-3b, p. 493
Background image of page 8
PM-2.5 – Particulate matter less than 2.5 µm in diameter Health effects 1. Usually cancer causing (carcinogenic) Removed by precipitation. Wet haze – A thin amount of water vapor condenses onto suspended particles that effectively scatters incoming sunlight to give the sky a milky look. Fig. 18-4, p. 494
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 36

23 Air Pollution - Air Pollutants airborne substances...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online