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Ichiyo+108 - Higuchi Ichiyo(1872-1896 Takekurabe(Child`s...

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Higuchi Ichiyo (1872-1896) Takekurabe (Child’s Play)--1895-6 Robert Danly, In the Shade of Spring Leaves , (Yale, 1981) Donald Keene: Dawn to the West: Fiction (Holt, 1984) Meiji Period—1868-1912 genbun itchi– I (vernacular-based writing)
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Terakoya i literally “temple schools,” private Edo-period academies for commoners. Waka i the most common form for classical Japanese poetry. Poems consists of 35 syllables, arranged in lines of 5,7,5,7,7. Nakajima Utako—principal of Haginoya Tale of Genji, Murasaki Shikibu—fictional tale from early 11 th c. Pillow Book , Sei Shōnagon—collection of short essays, early 11 th c. Kokinshū— imperial poetry anthology, 914. Nakarai Tōsui—Meiji period gesaku writer
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1893—Moves to Ryūsenji Yoshiwara i Ihara Saikaku D 1642-1693 Kōshoku ichidai otoko , (The Man Who Loved Love) i 1682
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It is as if, to every period of history, there corresponded a privileged age and a particular division of life: ‘youth’ is the privileged age of the seventeenth century, childhood of the nineteenth century, adolescence of the twentieth century. Philippe Aries, Centuries of Childhood , p. 32
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Adolescent World/Adult World 1. Is the adolescent world separate from that of adults? Does the hierarchies of the adult world infringe upon the world of adolescents? 1. How do children/adolescents become socialized into gender/status identities? 1. Are adolescents aware of the costs that will be exacted by becoming at adult? 1. What elements of the narrative—other than plot—emphasize transition as a central theme?
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The innocent one was Sangoro. They had kicked and beaten him to their hearts’ content, and he still ached two, three days afterward. He couldn’t stand up, he couldn’t sit down. Every evening when his father picked up the empty rickshaw and headed for the teahouses, someone would ask him what was wrong with the boy. “Say, your Sangoro looks a little peaked these days,” the caterer remarked, almost accusingly. “Somebody give him a pounding?” Groveling Tetsu they called his father, head always lowered before his betters.
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  • Spring '08
  • ITO
  • The Tale of Genji, Midori, Meiji period gesaku, private Edo-period academies, classical Japanese poetry, adult world infringe

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