LATERAL_STRATEGIES

LATERAL_STRATEGIES - INR 2002 Running Head LATERAL...

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  Running Head: LATERAL STRATEGIES LATERAL STRATEGIES A SYSTEM APPROACH LEVELS ANALYSIS BY: HAITHAM MELLOULI DR. LABEDZ 3/11/2008   I N R   2 0 0 2
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ABSTRACT In march of 2003, the United States announced that it will be taking action against Iraq if  it does not allow the entry and cooperation of UN inspectors. When the troops started to  swarm Iraq, they weren’t all from the United States. Other Countries such as UK, South  Korea, Australia, and many other countries had troops in Iraq.  A cornerstone of it war on  terror, Iraq is a proving ground on the foreign policy strategies and approaches through  many examples. This goal of this paper is to analyze if United States best interests in the  war on terror are better carried out unilaterally or multilaterally.  
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Lateral Strategies     3 LATERAL STRATEGIES UNI- AND MULTI- LATERAL STRATEGIES In deciding actions to take for its own sake, nation-states often face a decision on  whether a unilateral or multilateral is a more appropriate strategy to achieve the goals of  that nation-state’s interests without sacrificing too much. In order to understand how to  apply either strategy, they must be both understood well enough to apply them  appropriately. Unilateralism is a strategic approach where a nation-state takes a “go alone” strategy  in accomplishing specific goal. The nation-state uses its own forces for its missions,  provides its own resources and takes the losses/profits alone.  This approach tends to  work very well in achieving low risk activity. Multilateralism, on the other hand, provides for a strategy that includes a “teamwork”  strategy. Many nation-states gather their resources to achieve one common goal. The  collective of those nation-states take the risks and losses together, according to their level  of participation. Likewise, profits as a result of a multilateral approach are also shared  accordingly. According to the Hoover institution’s Policy Review Journal, there are three  prominent applications of multilateral strategy. Economic affairs resulting in  organizations such as WTO; Political affairs resulting in treaties and peace convoys; and 
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course INR 2002 taught by Professor Labedz during the Spring '08 term at Valencia.

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LATERAL_STRATEGIES - INR 2002 Running Head LATERAL...

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