Experiment #7: Making Soap: Base­Catalyzed Hydrolysis of a Triglyceride

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 4 pages.

Experiment  #7: Making Soap: Base-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of a Triglyceride Mostafa Elhaggar            Sarah and Ally Lab Section C         March 19, 2013
Abstract: This set of experiments navigated around a certain reaction called saponification to prepare soap  from cooking oils. Once done, the emulsifying properties of the soap were tested in hard or acidic water. A comparison of soaps made from different oils was conducted. Corn oil was used to  produce soap and in doing so, a gel/wax like substance was formed. The soap made from corn oil  was compared with soap made from walnut oil. The substance of the walnut oil consisted of a  hard squishy solid. The emulsifying properties of the soap produced from corn oil were tested by  adding it to a mineral oil and water solution. The soap allowed the water and oil to be partially  soluble. The same soap was then added to four different test tubes. The first test tube contained  CaCl 2  and tap water. The second test tube contained MgCl 2  and tap water. The third test tube  contained FeCl 3  and tap water. The fourth test tube contained tap water. Adding soap to the first  test tube produced a collected white chunky solution. Adding soap to the second test tube  produced a dispersed white chunky solution. Adding soap to the third test tube produced a thick  nontransparent orange solution. Lastly, adding soap to the water created a white cloudy  precipitate.  Background: A carboxylic acid group with an extended carbon chain that may contain double bonds is known  to be called a fatty carboxylic acid. If the compound only contains single bonds, it is known to be  a saturated fatty acid. However, if the compound contains one or more double bonds, it is known  to be a unsaturated fatty acid.  A triglyceride is considered an ester and consists of a glycerol and three fatty acids. Because of  the eclectic collection of oils, there are many triglycerides ranging from highly unsaturated to  saturated. Vegetable oils and animal fat consist of triglycerides. Triglycerides are important in 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture