psyc301 - Room 219, LS II 40 min experiment 3 points Sign...

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Room 219, LS II 40 min experiment 3 points Sign up – 12, 1 M-F UNIT 1 May 14, 2007 www.psychology.siu.edu/courses/301/ Introduction to Development Course Overview Unit 1 – General concepts, biology, and prenatal development Unit 2 – Infancy (0-2) Unit 3 – Early Childhood (2-6/7) Unit 4 – Middle childhood (6-12), Adolescence (13-19) Domains of Development physical – physical growth, motor skills, disease, illness cognitive – thinking, reasoning, talking, remembering (sometimes subdivided into linguistics – language) psychosocial – social relations, emotions, self-concept what are stages of development? how do infants learn to walk ? (physical) how is an attachment established between infants and their caretakers? (psychosocial) what aspects of intellectual development are universal across cultures? (cognitive) how are social roles acquired? (social) how and when does aggressive behavior develop? (social) what is something that “develops”? development development is change long term progressive determined continuity (growing tree) (continuous, quantitative) gradual, incremental, small change (physical state, vocabulary) discontinuity (changing forms) (discontinuous, qualitative) (stages) – abrupt reorganization, large change (walking/motor skills, but also size/growth spurt, vocabulary/burst) 2 Time Scales ontogeny – development across single individual’s lifespan phylogeny – evolution, change across multiple generations of species
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3 sources of change endogenous – internal causes (biological, genetic = nature) exogenous – external causes (imitation, parenting, school = nurture) epigenetic – biology and environment interact to shape development
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May 15, 2007 Theories of Development Investigating Change experiment – random assignment to groups; study causal effects naturalistic observation – behavior in the typical environment; correlated effects clinical interview/method – semi-structured interview Possible Explanations of Correlational Data Observed Correlational: As permissive parenting increases, children’s self-control decreases (naturalistic) Possible explanations for this correlation: Permissive parenting (causes) Children’s lack of self-control Children’s lack of self-control (causes) Permissive parenting Other factors such as genetic tendencies, poverty, or sociohistorial circumstances (causes both) permissive parenting and children’s lack of control Development and Time longitudinal study – same subjects studies as they age cross-sectional study – different subjects in each age group Comparing Theories Source of change: endogenous – maturational, biological, genetic exogenous – environmental epigenetic – interaction(ism) Type of change: stagewise, continous Biological-maturation (more biological, less environmental) Environmental-learning (more environmental, less biological) (Universal) Constructivist (equal size) Cultural-contextual (biological, universal environment, but also culture)
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psyc301 - Room 219, LS II 40 min experiment 3 points Sign...

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