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2.1.9 Lab: Investigate Watershed AnalysisWet LabAP Environmental Science Sem 1Points Possible:40Name:LaurenDate:Investigate Watershed AnalysisMany factors affect the quality of the water in areas of a watershed and are often linked to thehuman use of the area. In protected natural areas, the water tends to be cleaner and freer ofchemical pollutants and other contaminants. In agricultural and urban areas, water can becontaminated with substances that affect the water's clarity, dissolved oxygen level,nitrate/nitrite levels, pH, and more.In this lab, you will be investigating your local watershed. First you will use government data toresearch features of the local area of the watershed near you, and then you will identify a sourceof water in your watershed and test it at three different points.Be sure to:Follow safe practices during this investigation.
Check your location visit plan with your parent or guardian, and be sure they know whenand where you are going.Collect your water sample with an adult present.Do not go alone.Be careful around the water source you will be visiting. Avoid areas with fast-rushingwater and steep areas where you might fall in.Include time and a plan to travel to three different water sources.Read the instructions carefully on the water testing kit and follow them exactly.Use the testing chemicals carefully and avoid contact with your fingers.MaterialsComputer with InternetWater test kit — the more detailed, the better (found at local store or aquarium store)3 local natural water sources (including an upstream source and a downstream source)3 sealable containers (for collecting water samples)3 clear glass or plastic cups (for water testing)ProcedurePart 1: Research a Watershed Area1. First, you will do some research to learn about your watershed. Identify a source of flowingwater near you (the more natural, the better). This could be a local stream, creek, or river. Ideally,you will use a natural source, but if you need to, a local park or man-made river is an option. Anirrigation canal would be your last resort. Talk to an adult in the area, a local municipality, or yourinstructor if you need help identifying a good source.
a. Use the first link on your landing page, "The National Map," to learn more about thetopography (elevations) of your source. You can enter the name of a location, such as atown or a creek or river, and click the search icon. Or you can click on the area you want toview on the national map. A topographic map of the area you selected will appear, along witha menu of links to more information. Use the map that appears and the links as references.In the data collection section for Part 1a, record the name of your source of flowing waterand describe the topography of the areas immediately around it (within 1 mile). Include adescription of the elevations, which are found using the curvy brown lines that show thenatural hills and valleys of the area and include a number (the elevation) at some point along

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Term
Fall
Professor
Forsyth
Tags
Topography, Topographic map

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