Determination of Sugars By Density

Determination of Sugars By Density - known samples were...

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Determination of Sugars By Density Eric Ly October 1, 2007 Lab Section: H
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Purpose : The purpose of this experiment was to look at known sugar samples to determine the concentration of sugar in those samples. Then that data is used to compare and determine the concentration of sugars in certain commercial products. Procedure : In composition book pages 7-8 Data tables : see attached copies Calculations : Summary of Results : % Sugar Average Density (g/mL) 0.00 .991 5.15% 1.0087 10.15% 1.0297 15.06% 1.0450 Slope (m): .0035 Y-Intercept (b): .991 Equation: y = (.0035)x + .991 Product Identity Average Density (g/mL) % sugar Hawaiian Punch 1.0217 8.77% Arizona: Iced Tea 1.0270 10.29% Conclusion : The purpose of the experiment was achieved. The % sugars in each of the
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Unformatted text preview: known samples were determined along with their average density. That information was then used to make a graph and an equation was determined to be use in the finding of the unknown sugar percentages in the commercial products. Some possible sources of error include not calibrating the pipette and beakers well enough before every different trail. Another could be air bubbles getting in the pipette and affecting the calculation of the density. Lastly the measuring of the amount of sugar for the sugar solutions could be off or some of the sugar could have been lost during the transfer from weighing paper to bottle....
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Determination of Sugars By Density - known samples were...

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