Chapter 3-3 Biomes.pptx - Biomes and Aquatic Ecosystems...

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Biomes and Aquatic Ecosystems
Learning Objectives Identify how biomes are defined. Identify how aquatic ecosystems are defined. Describe the major categories of freshwater ecosystems. Explain how estuaries contribute to ecosystems.
Reading a Climate Diagram Seasonal patterns of temperature and precipitation associated with each biome can be summarized in a graph called a climate diagram . Shows the average temperature and precipitation at a given location during each month of the year. Temperature is plotted as a red line, and precipitation is shown as vertical blue bars.
Earth’s Biomes
Earth’s Biomes Earth’s terrestrial ecosystems are divided into at least ten different regional climate communities called biomes Described in terms of abiotic factors like climate and soil type and biotic factors like plant and animal life Associated with seasonal patterns of temperature and precipitation Organisms within each biome can be characterized by adaptations that enable them to live and reproduce successfully in their environment
Earth’s Biomes Even within a defined biome, there is often considerable variation among plant and animal communities Variations can be caused by differences in exposure, elevation, or local soil conditions. Local conditions also can change over time because of human activity or because of community interactions Biotic factors of biomes depend largely on abiotic factors, especially temperature and precipitation
The 6 Days of Creation
Tropical Rain Forest Abiotic: warm and wet year-round; soils are thin and nutrient-poor Biotic : plants with large leaves and buttress tree roots; animals active year-round
Tropical Dry Forest Home to more species than all other biomes combined At least 2 meters of it a year Tall trees form a dense, leafy covering called a canopy from 50 to 80 meters above the forest floor . In the shade below the canopy, shorter trees and vines form a layer called the understory . Organic matter on the forest floor is recycled and reused so quickly that the soil in most tropical rain forests is not very rich in nutrients. Important abiotic factors in rain forests: warm and wet year-round; soils are thin, nutrient-poor, and subject to erosion.
Tropical Grassland/Savanna/Scrubland Biotic : plants with waxy leaves, seasonal leaf loss; many animals migrate or are dormant during dry season Abiotic: warm; seasonal rainfall; compact soils; frequent fires set by lightning
Tropical Grassland/Savanna/Scrubland Receives more seasonal rainfall than deserts but less than tropical dry forests. Grassy areas are spotted with isolated trees and small groves of trees and shrubs. Compacted soils, fairly frequent fires, and the action of large animals—for example, rhinoceroses and elephants —prevent some areas from turning into dry forest
Tropical Grassland/Savanna/Scrubland When is the rainy season?

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