Historical and Theological Context of Everything that Rises

Historical and Theological Context of Everything that Rises...

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“THE LAME SHALL ENTER FIRST,” by Flannery O’Connor Historical Context Southern Race Relations The generation gap between Julian and his mother manifests itself through their disagreement  over race relations, an issue that was a pressing part of public discourse in the early 1960s. At the turn of the twentieth century, a series of "Jim Crow" laws had been instituted throughout  the South; these laws enforced segregation of public places. In fact, for the first half of the  twentieth century, blacks and whites used separate facilities: parks, restaurants, clubs,  restrooms, and transportation. In 1954 a landmark Supreme Court decision,  Brown vs. Board of Education , deemed school  segregation as inherently unequal. In the aftermath of this decision, African Americans won the  right to share public transportation with whites in a number of Southern cities. In 1960 "sit-ins" at  segregated lunch counters became a popular method of protesting against segregation. Such 
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Historical and Theological Context of Everything that Rises...

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