Arcadia essay zoe revised - 1 Feingold ZoeFeingold ProfessorSmith English201 Arcadia Arcadia,byTomStoppard, .

Arcadia essay zoe revised - 1 Feingold ZoeFeingold...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 9 pages.

1                                                                                                                                        Feingold Zoe Feingold Professor Smith English 201 11/26/12 Inability to Interpret the Past Evinced Through Mathematical Models Presented in Arcadia               Arcadia,  by Tom Stoppard, raises questions about the predictability of the future  and the ability to know the past. Stoppard presents these questions by juxtaposing  characters from the early 19 th  century who are concerned with understanding the future  with “modern day” (late 20 th  century) characters who seek knowledge of the past. In  Derek Alwes’ critical essay “’Oh, Phooey to Death!’: Boethian Consolation in Tom  Stoppard’s  Arcadia,”  Alwes claims that “the larger perspective conferred on us by the  temporal shifts in the play enables us to recognize that we can recover much of what has  been lost”(3). I agree with Alwes’ claim that the temporal shifts in the play allow us (the  audience) to recognize that  much  of what has been lost in the past can be recovered;  however, Stoppard’s portrayal of the  way  in which the past is recovered allows us to  recognize that, though we may be able to discover facts about the past, we cannot fully  understand  the events/phenomena and their motivating forces.  Arcadia  presents many of  its ideas by way of mathematical theories being explored by 19 th  century Thomasina and  20 th  century Valentine. By analyzing and comparing the mathematical models of 
2 Thomasina and Valentine, we can deduce Stoppard’s intent to portray the  incomprehensibility of the past. While Thomasina’s mathematical model proposes a method of applying a pattern  to the present, or to existing forms, in order to predict the future, Valentine attempts to  apply patterns to past events to explain the present. Both Thomasina and Valentine  demonstrate an understanding that changes in the universe are spontaneous and random,  that is, an understanding of the laws of entropy, but they nonetheless conceive that there  can be patterns applied to the randomness. Thomasina undertakes the project of using  equations that feed into each other (iteration) to diagram the form of a leaf. “We must  work outward from the middle of the maze,” Thomasina says to Septimus in reference to  diagramming natural forms using mathematics, “We will start with something simple. I  will plot this leaf and deduce its equation”(Stoppard 41). Thomasina is concerned with 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture