Experiment 7 Lab Report - Karl Fischer Titrations Applying...

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Karl Fischer Titrations – Applying Fundamental Chemical Principles LABORATORY WRITTEN REPORT OBJECTIVE The purpose of this experiment is to observe oxidation-reduction reactions, to learn the effects of shifting the equilibrium in a reaction, to learn the basics of ion conductivity and resistivity, to understand the importance of general chemistry fundamentals applied to Karl Fischer titrations, and to use an automated Karl Fischer titrator to determine the water content of a commercial material. EXPERIMENTAL METHOD Materials All materials necessary were provided by the Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry. Synthesis: Part 1 – Redox Reactions and Their Physical Effects In a well plate, four wells in each of the four columns were filled with 1.0 M Cu(NO 3 ) 2 , 1.0 M FeSO 4 , 1.0 M Pb(NO 3 ) 2 , and 1.0 M Zn(NO 3 ) 2 . Strips of Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn were each polished with steel wool and placed into each well. After 5 minutes, each well was examined carefully to see if any metal displacement or redox reaction had occurred. Part 2 – Equilibrium: Le Châtelier’s Principle 50 mL of tap water was heated in a 100 mL beaker to be used later in the experiment. 2 mL of 0.1 M CoCl 2 (CH 3 CH 2 OH) was added to a dry test tube and mixed with deionized water added drop-wise until a change was observed. Then, 12 M HCl was added to the solution drop-wise until a changed occurred. Water was then added until the solution turned purple, and half of the purple solution was poured into a separate test tube. One drop of AgNO 3 was added to the first test tube, and the observations were recorded. The second test tube was placed in the hot water bath, and swirled gently so as to be heated evenly. The test tube was then removed from the hot water bath and placed in the ice bath. Part 3 – Discovering the Conductivity of Polyethylene Oxide Salt Solutions Multimeter electrodes were lowered into the solution, and were a consistent distance apart. The resistance of the solution was measured. Using the resistivity, the conductivity of the solutions was calculated. Part 4 – Using a Karl Fischer Titrator to Determine the Water Content of Commercial Lotion Samples The mass was measured of a dry scintillation vial was measured and 1.56 g of hand sanitizer was placed into the vial. 4.03 g of methanol was then added to the hand sanitizer, the cap was placed on the vial and stirred until it was one homogenous solution. Approximately 1mL of the solution was drawn by a pipet.
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