paradise_lost2 - Nunez 1 Yennifer Nunez December 15th 2013...

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Nunez, 1Yennifer NunezDecember 15th, 2013Professor Michael Komorowski English 251, Section 7Internal ConflictTraditionally speaking, the first character introduced to the audience in an epic poem is the protagonist; whom, by the way is essentially a heroic figure. In the epic poem, “Paradise Lost,”this heroic figure is Satan. John Milton’s interpretation of Satan transcends the role of a hero. It is almost impossible for the reader to hate Satan. The reader is moved to share the slightest bit of compassion for Satan. In John Milton’s, “Paradise Lost”,Book IV, Satan’s soliloquy is explored. From the top of Mt. Niphates, lines 32-113 embody a cocktail of emotions within Satan himself. The reader is compelled to analyze a great amount of information and insight, and convinced to sympathize with Satan. Milton enlightens the reader with an in-depth interpretation of the protagonist: (Satan), and of his immense jealousy, admiration, and rage of the Creator’s latest creation, pride, and joy: humans. Through Satan’s soliloquy Milton embodiesa greater exploration as to the inception of sin and its justification. Through Satan’s speech, Milton draws one to conclude that the reason for Satan and Eve’s fall is indeed the Creator’s fault. Through Satan’s soliloquy, the reader can encompass Satan’s true feelings as he encounters a moment of reflection on his actions. Milton utilizes Satan’s soliloquy to tie up the different qualities and running emotions of Satan. Satan begins his speech by acknowledging andpraising God’s glory. Just as quickly as he begins, he repents his lucidity to validate his
Nunez, 2pursuance of evil actions. In his final conclusion, Satan asserts that the trigger for his absurd actions were due to God’s flaws in authority. The mere essence of Satan’s speech is the immense internal debate he has within himself.Satan’s intelligence and self-awareness is explored and presented. Contrary to one’s belief, this intense presence of self-awareness appears to torture Satan, as he relentlessly argues with himself. Satan feels that embracing such an accrued deal of self-awareness is alone his punishment for attempting to overthrow God. “Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell” (Line 75). The characteristics that form Satan’s personality he cannot despair or ignore. God created Satan, and chose to condemn him to exhibit intelligence, envy, and ambition. As much as Satan

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