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USH Module 7 Notes Directions: Complete the Module notes and attach them to your DBA before the Module Exam. 7.01: The Great Society: The Big Ideas What did LBJ think made a “Great Society”? Who were the “poor” in the 1950s and 1960s? What were their lives like? Many were children, migrant laborers, or the elderly. They often did not have access to health care, adequate housing, or regular income. They lived in cities as well as rural areas and a disproportionate number were African American. Conditions worsened in inner cities as wealthy whites moved to the suburbs to escape the crowding, a phenomenon known as "white flight." Briefly describe the War on Poverty. In the summer of 1964, Johnson declared "war on poverty in America" and signed his Economic Opportunity Act. The act created several programs aimed at education and employment. Johnson's campaign speeches promised greater changes to come if he was elected president. It was a very liberal vision, one that saw the federal government as responsible for securing and improving Americans' well-being. Not all Americans supported his ideas. What were the differences between conservatives and liberals in the 60s? Liberal vision, one that saw the federal government as responsible for securing and improving Americans' well- being. The conservative vision was to end of several New Deal-era policies, as opposed to expanding them as Johnson promised. Goldwater and other conservatives thought Johnson's Great Society could put limits on Americans' freedoms. What were the Great Society programs? President Johnson was most active in domestic policy between the years 1964–1966. His agenda was the largest set of social welfare programs since Roosevelt's New Deal. How did the Great Society programs impact Americans? Poverty Rate decreased, Infant Mortality rate declines, Poverty stricken people have healthcare, People have indoor plumbing, unemployment rate drops, African American wages increase by 53%. What happened to the Great Society? As American involvement in Vietnam increased, money became a bigger issue. Johnson had to divert funding away from his anti-poverty programs to support the military. By 1966, attention to the domestic programs was falling. More Americans became focused on events in Vietnam and protests at home. How do the Great Society programs under Johnson compare to the New Deal programs started by Roosevelt? The New Deal under FDR enjoyed longer and broader support, but failed to deal directly with the issue of civil rights. Both the New Deal and Great Society programs faced criticism that they cost the taxpayers too much, put the government in debt, and benefited only a portion of Americans. Though Vietnam and conservatism overshadowed many of his Great Society programs, President Johnson's civil rights legislation endured. Many historians consider it his greatest achievement as president.

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