The United States in WWII Study Guide - Chapter 17 Hot Seat People William F(Buffalo Bill Cody o 1860 whites began systematically to hunt the animals to

The United States in WWII Study Guide - Chapter 17 Hot Seat...

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Chapter 17 Hot Seat People William F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody o 1860- whites began systematically to hunt the animals to supply the eastern markets with carriage robes and industrial belting o William F. (buffalo Bill) Cody, a famous scout and Indian fighter, killed nearly 43 hundred bison to feed construction crew building the Union Pacific Railroad. o Army commanders encouraged the slaughter of buffalos to undermine Indian resistance. Sitting Bull o To protect their hinting grounds, raided non-Indian settlements in Nebraska and Wyoming o Non-treaty Sioux found a powerful leader in the Lakota Sioux Chief and holy man Sitting Bull o led by experience and had considerable fighting experience o Led the Indians against Custer in battle of Little Bighorn and won! George Armstrong Custer* o Feeling the pressure, the federal government took action o 1874- General Williams Tecumseh Sherman sent a force under Colonel George Armstrong Custer unit the Black Hills of South Dakota. o He was lean, mustachioed, shoulder length- reddish blond hair, 34 years old and a celebrity since Civil War o His job was to find a location to keep an eye on renegade Indians (really to confirm rumors of gold in the Black Hills) o drive the Indian out of the Black Hills o Lost at the battle of Little Bighorn underestimating the Indians o He was out-numbered, his troops wiped out Chief Joseph* o Defeat in Battle of the little Big Horn made army more determined. o Troops harassed various Sioux bands. o Similar measures were used elsewhere in the West against Chief Joseph and his Nez Perces of Oregon and against the northern Cheyenne’s, who had been forcibly transported to Oklahoma after the Battle of the little Big Horn. Helen Hunt Jackson o Growing number of Americans were outraged by the Gov’ts flagrant violation of its Indian treaties. o Woman’s National Indian Rights association, founded in 1883 and other groups took up the cause. o Published A century of Dishonor , to rally public opinion against the gov’ts record of broken treaty obligations. o Advocated for the creation of Boarding schools “Wild Bill Hickok* o One legacy of the cattle boon was the growth of cities like Abilene, Kansas, which shipped steer to Chicago and eastern markets. o Abilene went through an early period of violence that saw cowboys pulling down the walls of the jail as it was being built. o City ordinance forbade carrying firearms and regulatory saloons, gambling, and prostitution.
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o Hickok served as town Marshal in 1871. He was described as a “veritable terror to bad man in the border”, but during his term he only killed two men (and one by accident). Frederic Remington* o The dime novels and Wild West shows greatly caught the attention of 3 young members of the eastern elite (they were intensely affected by the adventure): Theodore Roosevelt Frederic Remington He and Roosevelt exalted the disappearing frontier as the proving ground for a new kind of virile manhood and the last outpost of an honest and true social order.
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