Inquiry 2 - Veglia1 TheresaVeglia ChanonAdsanatham ENG112 8April2014 Media: Everywherewelook,thin,,onbillboards andonTV. Thishasbecomethest

Inquiry 2 - Veglia1 TheresaVeglia ChanonAdsanatham ENG112...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Veglia 1 Theresa Veglia Chanon Adsanatham ENG 112 8 April 2014 Media: Rulers of Happiness and Success in Women Everywhere we look, thin, tan models are plastered in magazines, on billboards and on TV.  We see them flaunting their toned and fit bodies that every woman admires. This has become the standard of beauty for woman today, but it hasn’t always been this way.  The standard of beauty for women is ever changing, always differentiating from the decade before.  The past few decades, however, the beauty standard has become extreme and seemingly impossible to achieve.  What has caused the drastic change in the beauty standard? It is safe to conclude that media and propaganda have been the most influential factors in the change.  Media and propaganda portray women in a light that is not easy to achieve.  It gives off the impression that to be happy, live a successful life, and to be considered beautiful, women must live up to the standards that the media propagates. This, in turn, affects self-image in women.  They compare themselves to models whose jobs are to work out and stay fit.  If a woman doesn’t live up to the beauty standard, it can lead to serious impacts on their bodies, affecting them psychologically and physically. Women have always gone through extremes to be considered beautiful, but with the huge increase in media and propaganda, women have been challenged even greater to achieve the beauty standard.  If we were to look back in time, women were set with more realistic standards of beauty than the ones that are set today.  
Image of page 1
Veglia 2 In the past, women didn’t always strive to be stick skinny. For example, during the   Renaissance   era,   the   ideal   woman   was   more   voluptuous.     Women   would   be considered overweight by today’s standards but they were considered sexy during the Renaissance.  Besides fuller body types, women strived to have lighter color hair.  They believed   the   lighter   the   hair   the   more   beautiful.     Makeup   during   this   period   was characterized by ivory and pale skin tones to contrast the ruby red lip color.   As the decades went on, beauty standards started to become more materialistic.   The roaring twenties   “brought   us   Coco   Chanel,   shorter   hemlines,   and   flappers”,   based   on   “A Timeline of Sexy Defined Through the Ages” but StyleCaster.  Bold makeup was now considered sexy; the eyebrows were lifted and penciled in.  Women became more body conscious as time went on as well.  They were more aware of what they ate and how much they worked out.  Fitted clothes came into style and beauty was more and more
Image of page 2

Want to read all 7 pages?

Image of page 3

Want to read all 7 pages?

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 7 pages?

  • Spring '08
  • Savoie
  • Tone, Ode, Physical attractiveness, Jaeger, Beauty Standard

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture