Millenium Development Goals

Millenium Development Goals - The Millennium Development...

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The Millennium Development Goals A Common Cause May 18, 2006 Millennium Development Goals A Common Cause
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Imagine if the world could agree on one document. Imagine if the world could come together to meet common goals. The Millennium Declaration is such a document. In 2000, all members of the United Nations signed the Millennium Declaration. Finally, came a document the whole world agreed upon. The Millennium Declaration is monumental because it affirms that nations have a, “Collective responsibility to uphold the principles of human dignity, equality, and equity at the global level” (United, 55/2 United NP). The nations also agreed to the fundamental values including freedom, equality, solidarity, tolerance, respect for nature and shared responsibility (United, Millennium NP). Out of the Millennium Declaration and its fundamental values grew the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs are a set of eight goals which, in accordance with the Millennium Declaration, all nations have agreed to beet by 2015. These goals are to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and to develop a global partnership for development (Global 1). The beauty of the goals is that they are all interconnected. No goal can be achieved without progress on another. Studies have shown an increase in level of education leads to a decrease in HIV/AIDS infections. Child mortality cannot be reduced without elimination of hunger and malnutrition which leads their bodies to be more susceptible to disease and thus death. The role of developed and non-developed countries differs. Developed nations are meant to achieve goal eight, developing a global partnership for development (“Eveline” NP). Developing nations are supposed to focus on the first seven goals.
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These goals have come at a crucial time. Over 2.8 billion people on earth are under the age of 25 or roughly half the world’s population (“Eveline” NP). If the world does not act it is the future of the 2.8 billion youth which is at risk. Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger The specifics of goal one is to halve, between 1990 and 2015, the number of people whose income is less than $1 a day and the proportion of people who suffer hunger (World 1). These goals will be measured by the prevalence of underweight children under five, and the proportion of the population below minimum dietary energy consumption (World 1). Between 1990 and 2001 extreme poverty was cut by 25% in at least 30 countries. Fourteen of these countries where located in Sub-Saharan Africa, although in the region as a whole there has been an increase in the number of people living on less than $1 a day bringing the percentage to 46.4% of the population. Eastern Asia has seen the greatest reduction from 33% of the population in 1990 to 16.6%, only .1% away from achieving the MDG.
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Millenium Development Goals - The Millennium Development...

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