Legal Studies Notes-2 - LegalStudiesNotes LawofTorts Introduction o DefinitionofTort: o o TypesofTorts IntentionalTorts Negligence StrictLiability

Legal Studies Notes-2 - LegalStudiesNotes LawofTorts...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 9 pages.

Legal Studies Notes: Law of Torts: - Introduction: o Definition of Tort: Violation of a duty imposed by the civil law where the  goal is to compensate the injured party.  o An attempt to hold people liable to their contracts.  o Types of Torts: Intentional Torts Negligence Strict Liability Can not put on a defense.  In LA, 3 things you are liable for no-matter what: o Construction- pile driving. o Drunk Driving Intentional Torts: Creatures of State Law Are type based and each is proved differently. Involve a conscious act and with intended consequences.  Two Types: o Against Person- Assault: the reasonable fear of immediate  harmful contact.  o Against Property-  Is the completion of the assault (ex. Physical contact).  Ex. False imprisonment, assault, battery, defamation of  character, slander, libel,  - ABSOLUTE TRUTH: o In the constitution, it is explicitly spelled out that in sessions of  congress   there is no reprecussions that can result in what is said. 
Image of page 1
Legal Studies Chapter 13: - Negligence: o Special Negligence Doctrines: Re Ispa Loquitor: “The thing speaks for itself… the even wouldn’t have  happened if it would not have happened without the  negligence”.  Defendant had exclusive control of the thing or act that  caused that harm. The harm would not normally occur without negligence. The plaintiff had no role in causing the harm. Negligence Per Se: Negligent by legal definition- violation of a legal statute  that results in a harm.  A statute must clearly set out: o The standard of conduct o When/ where conduct is expected o Of whom the conduct is expected.  o Ex. Texting and driving, speeding, drunk driving.  Plaintiff must demonstrate that the statute is designed to  prevent: o The injury suffered o The plaintiff falls within the class of people the  statute protects.  Comparative negligence v. Contributory negligence: Contributory Negligence: A person is not allowed to sue if  the person is only 1% at fault for their injury.  o Don’t want to reward parties who contribute to their own harm.  o Been removed by almost every state in the country. Comparative Negligence: o You have to have duty, breach of duty, and  causation.  o Must show proximate cause and breach of duty. o (Must show they’re connected).  o Total award / % at fault = Total Award o Defense to Negligence: Superseding or intervening force Contributory negligence Bars Claim o Last clear chance exception Comparitive Negligence:
Image of page 2
o Apply the contributory negligence percentage to  reduce compensation Modified comparative negligence
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture