Paper #2 - 2 Samuel 11-12 interpretation - 2 Samuel 11-12 Interpretation Paper 1 2 Samuel 11-12 Interpretation Paper Kelsey Nordell Azusa Pacific

Paper #2 - 2 Samuel 11-12 interpretation - 2 Samuel 11-12...

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2 Samuel 11-12 Interpretation Paper12 Samuel 11-12 Interpretation PaperKelsey NordellAzusa Pacific UniversityUBBL 310: I & II SamuelProfessor Dr. Matt ThomasApril 25, 2013
2 Samuel 11-12 Interpretation Paper2InterpretationThroughout the passage 2 Samuel 11-12, David commits a couple major sins. For one of these sins, David thinks he can cover up his sin so no one will ever know what he himself, the king, did. For the second major sin, because his first action to cover himself did not work as planned, he resorted to committing another sin. In this passage, David is confronted about these sins, and repents, but there are consequences to pay when a person sins.The beginning of 2 Samuel 11 begins with David seeing a beautiful woman bathing from up on the roof of his palace. He sent someone to find out who she was, because of his high desire for her. He is told who she is, but her name is hyphenated. Her name is “Bathsheba-daughter of Eliam, wife of Uriah the Hittie.”1This hyphenated name was used to show who she belonged to, or whose ‘property’ she was. Even with knowing this and knowing she is a married woman, David still insists that he needs her and knows he has the power to be with her because he is the king. What happens next is “nothing but action…no conversation…no hint of caring, ofaffection, of love-only lust.”2David acts on self-indulgence and sleeps with Bathsheba, the wife of another man. It is here that Bathsheba is known to have said her first words “I am pregnant,” which come as a shock to David.31 Brueggemann, Walter. First and Second Samuel.(Louisville, Ky: Westminster John Knox Press, 2012), 273.2 Ibid.3 Ibid, 274.
2 Samuel 11-12 Interpretation Paper3David realizes what a mess he has put himself in, because it was impossible for Uriah to be the father of Bathsheba’s child, and “attempts to cover up the unfortunate consequences of hisaffair with Bathsheba.”4David “underestimated Uriah’s character” when he “attempts to manipulate and control Uriah…to spend a night at home with his wife,” which would create the possibility of Uriah being the father and David’s affair being covered up.5When David fails the two times he attempted to have Uriah sleep with his wife Bathsheba, he has to resort to another method of covering his sin. This plan was much more violent than his original idea. David wrote a letter and had Uriah deliver his own “death warrant” to Joab, instructing him to place Uriah “opposite the elite force of Ammonite troops”6knowing he would be outmatched, and would not survive the battle. This time, David’s plan worked and Uriah was killed in battle just as planned.

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