Feb 12-19 Lecture slides

Feb 12-19 Lecture slides - What is immigration? Is it...

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What is immigration? Is it something new to human beings? Who immigrates?
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Who immigrates? Longest Animal Migration Measured, Bird Flies 40,000 Miles a Year John Roach: National Geographic News. August 8, 2006
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Human migration has existed for hundreds of thousands of years. Immigration in the modern sense refers to movement of people from one nation-state to another, where they are not Citizens. The movement of populations in modern times has continued under the form of both voluntary migration within one's region, country, or beyond, and involuntary migration (which includes slave trade, Human Trafficking, and escaping ethnic cleansing).
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Reasons for immigration? Escaping Natural [ ecological ] disaster Escaping war (Political Refugees fear for their lives ) In search of Political Freedom In search of Religious Tolerance In search of economic Opportunity – (People want a better life - better job - more money ) Some want free atmosphere (free life style) Forced Immigration (Slavery, human trafficking) Family Reunification
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Immigrating to America 1607-1924 and present Land and resources were in abundance in America (British) Forced Immigration (Slavery) Criminal Incarceration/Deportment. Some criminals were transported to the colonies to serve their sentences of hard labor or to simply get rid of them permanently. Irish, Germans, Italians, Greeks etc wanted to escape poverty and came to America for Work Jews and other religious minorities came for religious freedom (escape persecution) America was (and still is) hyped up in many countries as " Land of Opportunity "
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Natural Disaster Deepening ecological damage around the world (Global warming). Environmental damage might be caused by volcanic eruption, earthquakes, hurricanes, drought, landslides, floods, and forest fires. People living in areas hardest hit by the drought and faced with the prospect of starvation, move to other areas within their own country and, ultimately, crossed borders to countries where the drought was not as severe.
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In war and conflict regions more landmines continue to be planted . As a result, farmers are too afraid to work in their fields, so have strong incentive to emigrate.
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Political Political conditions may be too oppressive to be endured, and as a result, people may flee to other areas or countries. Turmoil resulting from war , political rivalry, ethnic strife , and social inequities (Women’s status) tends to promote migration. Its roots take various forms: coups or civil war.
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In many Developing countries the overall human rights record continued to be marred by a pattern of abusive behavior perpetrated by the security forces, as well as an ineffective judicial system (Repressive regimes!).
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Socio-cultural settings More contemporary examples of socio-cultural variables acting as 'push' factors can also be cited. Bosnia, Kosovo , Rwanda, for instance, illustrate how people are forced out of their
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course BIO 102 taught by Professor Doll during the Spring '08 term at Loyola Chicago.

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Feb 12-19 Lecture slides - What is immigration? Is it...

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