malhotra11_tif - копия - копия

malhotra11_tif - копия - копия - Chapter 11...

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Chapter 11 – Questionnaire and Form Design True/False Questions 1. A questionnaire is a structured technique for data collection that consists of a series of questions, written or verbal, which a respondent answers. True (moderate, page 288) 2. According to the text, a conversational style should be avoided when writing interviewer-administered questionnaires. False (easy, page 290) 3. Collecting demographic information that can be used in direct mail campaigns is mentioned in the text as a specific objective of a questionnaire. False (moderate, page 295) 4. The last step in the questionnaire design process is to reproduce the questionnaire. False (difficult, page 290) 5. A single question that attempts to cover two issues is called a double-barreled question. True (moderate, page 292) 6. When respondents are unable to articulate a response to a question, this usually indicates they have no opinion on that topic. False (moderate, page 294) 7. To increase the likelihood of obtaining sensitive information, such topics should be placed in the middle of the questionnaire. False (difficult, page 295) 8. Open-ended is a popular form of structured question. False (moderate, page 296) 9. Open-ended questions that respondents answer in their own words are called unstructured questions. True (easy, page 296) 10. According to the text, unstructured questions are also referred to as free-response or free-answer questions. True (moderate, page 296) 11. Dichotomous questions allow the respondent to express their attitudes or opinions without the bias associated with restricting responses to predefined alternatives. False (moderate, page 298) 12. Open-ended questions are most useful in conclusive research and as opening questions. False (moderate, page 296) 13. Questions that prespecify the set of response alternatives and the response format are called structured questions. True (moderate, page 296) 14. In multiple-choice questions, the researcher provides a choice of answers, and respondents are asked to select one or more of the alternatives given. True (easy, page 297) 114
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15. A respondent's tendency to choose an alternative merely because it occupies a certain position on the page or in a list is called order bias. True (moderate, page 298) 16. An open-ended question is a structured question with only two response alternatives, such as yes or no. False (easy, page 298) 17. According to the text, dichotomous questions should be used when the researcher has reason to believe that the respondent thinks of the topic in yes/no terms. True (moderate, page 298) 18. To avoid problems in question wording, a researcher should use leading questions when designing a questionnaire. False (difficult, page 301) 19. A researcher should use questions with positive statements only to avoid problems with question wording. False (moderate, page 302) 20. "Usually," "normally," and "frequently" are examples of words that are oftentimes considered confusing to respondents.
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