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historypape2 - of society. Dostoevsky does not like the...

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Andrew Holzman 10/01/07 History 120 Sec. 310 Essay 2 Question 2 The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche once said, “All things are subject to interpretation whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth”, but how would Nietzsche react to the equation two times two equals four? There is no other answer to the equation, other than four, that will not change over time no matter what the interpretation is, and that is why two times two equals four is a powerful statement. The crystal palace is an example of this strong logic; it is a transparent object that is very easy to comprehend. As a monument to industrialization the crystal palace represents the overwhelming industrial power England had over Eastern Europe and the rest of the world. Unfortunately for Nietzsche, it appears that there are some things that only have one interpretation, and these are the strongest parts
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Unformatted text preview: of society. Dostoevsky does not like the equation, nor does he like the crystal palace, which he despises because of what it has come to represent. As a Russian nationalist and a romantic realist author, Dostoevsky has come to dislike his fellow Russians like Chernevshevksy who are conforming to the western way of life. Dostoevsky does not like the crystal palace for two reasons; he does not like the west, and he does not like anything as transparent as the palace. While discussing it Dostoevsky mentions that the palace is a chicken coup, where everybody is conforming to one way of life, and he cannot stand for that. By banging his head against the symbolic wall of truth, power, and logic, Dostoevsky believes that there must be another solution than the easy and obvious solutions that society has come up with....
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course HIST 120 taught by Professor Koshar during the Fall '07 term at Wisconsin.

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