Organ Donation by alex

Organ Donation by alex - Organ Donation By Alex Daza Organ...

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Organ Donation By Alex Daza Organ Donation
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By Alex Daza Professor Zarzycki Research and Technology 6/27/06 Organ Donation is the removal of tissues or organs from a human body who has recently died, or from a living donor for the purpose of transplanting them into other people. A. You can donate kidneys, liver, lungs, and hearts. The most popular type of organ donated by living donors is the Kidneys.
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A kidney can be donated from two sources. Either from a cadeveric donor or a living donor. a. A cadeveric donor is one who is deceased and can be donated to one who is need of a transplant. b. A living donor is one who is alive and voluntary donates his or her organ. There is also a live related donor. a. A live related donor comes from a blood relative, like a parent, brother, sister, or an adult child. b. A kidney from a live related donor is a better match because it is faster, because you don’t have to wait for a donor on the national waiting list. c. The national waiting list is a list of people waiting for a non-living kidney transplant managed by UNOS on a computer in Richmond Virginia. B. the most common living donor procedure involves the kidney. When donating a kidney, the donor is admitted to the transplant hospital the day before the operation a. Laboratory tests, blood work, a chest X-ray, and an EKG may be performed again to verify the donor's health status. b. involves a surgical incision around the donor's lower back and side c. Immediately after the operation, a nurse will ask the donor to turn, cough and breathe deeply to help clear the lungs of secretions d. After five to eight days the donor may return home and is asked not to due heavy lifting or rough sports for 6 weeks. After four weeks of surgery the donor may return to work Acceptable organ donors can range in age from newborn to 65 years or more In order to qualify as a living donor, an individual must be physically fit, in good general health, and free from high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, kidney disease, and heart disease. Individuals considered for living donation are usually between 18-60 years of age. A. Persons under the age of 18 must have parent or guardians consent. B. Non-resident aliens can both donate and receive organs in the United States B. Another acceptable organ donors are those who are brain dead. A. These are where most organs come from resulting from a stroke or tragic accident. B. Brain death is when the brain stops functioning but the lungs and heart continue to function with ventilators.
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Death can be pronounced in two ways. A. When a persons heart stops beating or when the brain stops functioning which is brain death. B. Brain death occurs when oxygen and blood cannot flow to the brain. 1.
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course HEALTH GE 2023 taught by Professor Zarzycki during the Spring '08 term at Kean.

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Organ Donation by alex - Organ Donation By Alex Daza Organ...

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