Fed notes from calvin - The Federalist Papers#1 Federalist...

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The Federalist Papers #1: Federalist No. 1 is essentially a preface to the series, laying out in broad strokes the major points that the authors hope to demonstrate - that the Articles of Confederation should be disposed of, and that the proposed new Constitution is so written as to properly distribute the powers of government to the greatest benefit of the governed. #9: A major aspect of Federalist No. 9 is Hamilton's response to the common Anti- Federalist argument based on the theories of Montesquieu , who wrote famously in his The Spirit of the Laws that "it is natural to a republic to have only a small territory, otherwise it cannot long subsist." The Anti-Federalist took his arguments to mean that the federal Union was bound to fail. Hamilton responded that if Montesquieu were taken literally, then since he was thinking of dimensions far smaller even than those of the states, the Americans would have to split themselves into "an infinity of little, jealous, clashing tumultuous commonwealths." More seriously, Hamilton contends that the confederated federal system described in the proposed Constitution would not suffer as Montesquieu predicted simply due to its confederated rather than centralized design. #10: No. 10 addresses the question of how to guard against " factions ," groups of citizens with interests contrary to the rights of others or the interests of the whole community. In today's discourse the term special interest often carries the same connotation. Madison argued that a strong, large republic would be a better guard against those dangers than smaller republics—for instance, the individual states. Opponents of the Constitution offered counterarguments to his position, which were substantially derived from the commentary of Montesquieu on this subject. Federalist No. 10 continues a theme begun in Federalist No. 9 ; it is titled, "The Same Subject Continued: The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection." The whole series is cited by scholars and jurists as an authoritative interpretation and explication of the meaning of the Constitution. Jurists have frequently
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