Journal Example -...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

Justo L. Gonzalez, “Preparing the Way for Constantine,” in Faith and Wealth: A History ofEarly Christian Ideas on the Origin, Significance, and Use of Money (San Francisco: Harperand Rowe, 1990), 132-145.In “Preparing the Way for Constantine,” Justo Gonzalez argues that the economic status of the late third century led to conditions that favored the spread and acceptance of Christianity. Thus, it is implied that Constantine’s eventual decision to legalize Christianity may have been partially influenced by a desire to gain acceptance among a public that was already favorable towards Christianity. Gonzalez establishes his argument primarily through two methods. First, he summarizes the diversity of Christianity in terms of the range of the classes and economic status of people who labeled themselves as Christians. While Gonzalez does concede that there were “large numbers of Christians belonging to the lower classes,” he also proves (through cemetery records) that there were “a fair number of [Christians] in relatively comfortable circumstances” (133). These members consisted of “middle class and lower middle class artisans and traders” (133). Therefore, Christians ranged from the starving poor to the comfortable middle class. As the church “found it necessary to promote giving  on the part of those who had means” the disparity of members who could afford to give and wide number of members who needed help allowed the church to gain a “reputation for its charitable work” (133). To accentuate this point, Gonzalez moves on to his second method of argument in which he relies heavily on the writings of Lactantius, who wrote extensively about Christianity and compassion. While Lactantius does support private property, he believes that “we owe each other aid in times of distress of difficulty” (140) and goes on to write about the need to give to those “from whom you expect nothing in return” (141). Unsurprisingly, this theory appeals to the lower masses, who hoped for a “reversal of fortunes between the rich and poor” (142). As a result, legalizing Christianity was 
likely to increase Constantine’s popularity with the general public, which may have been one of his motives for doing so. Overall, Gonzalez is successful in his argument, as he seems to 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture