Tempo and Mode in Hominid Evolution

Tempo and Mode in Hominid Evolution - With Respects to the...

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Tempo and mode in Evolution Were homo sapiens a result of punctuated equilibrium? With Respects to the late Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002)
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What is Tempo and Mode? George Gaylord Simpson was the first to make these terms popular in evolution in his book, Tempo and Mode in Evolution. Tempo refers to the rate of evolution. Mode refers to the pattern of evolution, basically mode entails how evolution takes place.
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Why study Tempo and Mode? It seems a rather moot point to discuss the tempo of evolution particularly with the knowledge of micro- evolution. But tempo has important implications in how we view the mode of evolution as earlier mentioned. Ian Tattersall, a paleontologist featured prominently in the Bryson book says: “we need to bear in mind that how we view the evolutionary process that gave rise to us profoundly affects how we interpret the evidence of our origin.” (emphasis mine) Hominid evolution is of particular interest when placed under the scrutiny of how tempo can affect the way we perceive the mode of evolution.
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Controversy in Hominid Evolution:  Reasons and Implications Against Evolutionary Synthesis Punctuated Equilibrium
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The Evolutionary Synthesis Since Darwin and Wallace went public with their findings in 1858, there was much confusion about the nature of evolution. However, around the 1930s, genetic scientists surmised that micro-changes in the genes might actually be responsible for the macro- level changes that more often caught their attention. This was first seen in a book by Theodosius Dobzhansky, Genetics and the Origin of Species.
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The Evolutionary Synthesis continued Dobzhansky equated the micro-changes that he could reproduce in the lab as an experimental geneticist, but as a naturalist he knew that several discontinuities existed in nature. However, he still equated micro-changes with macro-level changes. Ernst Mayr further strengthened this evolutionary synthesis in his book Systematics and the Origin of Species.
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Tempo and Mode in the Evolutionary Synthesis As such, the tempo and mode of evolution would be considered gradual, and this was accepted widely in paleontology when George Gaylord Simpson published his book Tempo and Mode in Evolution as earlier mentioned. The evolutionary synthesis between genetic research and
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course USP ULS2202 taught by Professor Myron during the Spring '08 term at National University of Singapore.

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Tempo and Mode in Hominid Evolution - With Respects to the...

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