Biol 1201 test2notes2

Biol 1201 test2notes2 - Biol 1201 Section 1 Examination Two...

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Biol 1201 Section 1 Examination Two Thursday, March 8 at 6:00 PM in Campbell Auditorium Membranes and membrane function 9 Questions How are membranes adjusted for different temperatures? P.126 and 127. Transport of materials across the membrane What types of molecules can move across the membrane? What kinds of molecules would pass through a membrane, i.e- a phospholipid bilayer? Nonpolar and small. Examples: Gases Steroid hormones Water Active, Facilitated, and Simple: Transport Processes: Active o Against concentration gradient. o Requires supplied energy (ATP) o Carrier molecule (protein in the membrane, involved in the movement a.c.g.). o Work must done Passive o Down concentration gradient o Does not require supplied energy o Diffusion (simple of facilitated). Simple o Down Concentration Gradient o Depends on molecular movement o Does not use a carrier o No supplied energy o Facilitated: o Carrier molecule involved. o Down concentration gradient o Molecular movement o No supplied energy Tonicity and aquatic organisms - from lecture
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Marine invertebrates (without backbones) Isotonic with seawater Invertebrates accumulate free amino acids to match the tonicity of seawater. Marine elasmobranch fishes Sharks and rays Isotonic w. seawater Accumulate up to .5 M urea Freshwater bony fishes (teleost fishes) Hypertonic to freshwater In sea water hypotonic to seawater Hyper-, hypo- and isotonic Hypertonic Lower water potential More solutes dissolved Hypertonic solutions will tend to gain water. Water is going to move from higher to lower water potential Hypotonic Higher water potential Fewer solutes dissolved Hypotonic solutions will tend to lose water Isotonic Equal water potential Equal number of solutes dissolved No net movement of water Osmosis and the direction of net water movement Figures 7.2, 7.3, 7.5, 7.11, 7.13, 7.17 Photosynthesis 9 Questions Focus on the material covered in the work sheet Calvin-Benson Cycle and Light Reactions: Two stages of photosynthesis Light reactions is the photo part of photosynthesis, and the Calvin cycle in the synthesis part. Light reactions convert solar energy to chemical energy. They occur on the thylakoid membranes of the chloroplasts and convert solar energy to the chemical energy of ATP and NADPH, evolving oxygen in the process. The Calvin-Benson Cycle occurs in the stroma and consists of carbon fixation, reduction, and regeneration of the CO2 acceptor. Using electrons from NADPH and energy from ATP, the cycle synthesizes a three carbon sugar (G3P). Most of the G3P is reused in the cycle but some exits the cycle and is converted to glucose and other organic molecules.
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Reducing Power and ATP Where various processes occur ATP synthases (Fig. 10.16) ATP synthase uses this proton motive force to make ATP. Chemiosmosis Compared
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course BIOL 1201 taught by Professor Wishtichusen during the Spring '07 term at LSU.

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Biol 1201 test2notes2 - Biol 1201 Section 1 Examination Two...

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