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Unformatted text preview: EAI/Springer Innovations in Communication and Computing Dagmar Cagáňová Natália Horňáková Editors Mobility Internet of Things 2018 Mobility IoT EAI/Springer Innovations in Communication and Computing Series editor Imrich Chlamtac, European Alliance for Innovation, Ghent, Belgium Editor’s Note The impact of information technologies is creating a new world yet not fully understood. The extent and speed of economic, life style and social changes already perceived in everyday life is hard to estimate without understanding the technological driving forces behind it. This series presents contributed volumes featuring the latest research and development in the various information engineering technologies that play a key role in this process. The range of topics, focusing primarily on communications and computing engineering include, but are not limited to, wireless networks; mobile communication; design and learning; gaming; interaction; e-health and pervasive healthcare; energy management; smart grids; internet of things; cognitive radio networks; computation; cloud computing; ubiquitous connectivity, and in mode general smart living, smart cities, Internet of Things and more. The series publishes a combination of expanded papers selected from hosted and sponsored European Alliance for Innovation (EAI) conferences that present cutting edge, global research as well as provide new perspectives on traditional related engineering fields. This content, complemented with open calls for contribution of book titles and individual chapters, together maintain Springer’s and EAI’s high standards of academic excellence. The audience for the books consists of researchers, industry professionals, advanced level students as well as practitioners in related fields of activity include information and communication specialists, security experts, economists, urban planners, doctors, and in general representatives in all those walks of life affected ad contributing to the information revolution. About EAI EAI is a grassroots member organization initiated through cooperation between businesses, public, private and government organizations to address the global challenges of Europe’s future competitiveness and link the European Research community with its counterparts around the globe. EAI reaches out to hundreds of thousands of individual subscribers on all continents and collaborates with an institutional member base including Fortune 500 companies, government organizations, and educational institutions, provide a free research and innovation platform. Through its open free membership model EAI promotes a new research and innovation culture based on collaboration, connectivity and recognition of excellence by community. More information about this series at Dagmar Cagáˇnová • Natália Horˇnáková Editors Mobility Internet of Things 2018 Mobility IoT 123 Editors Dagmar Cagáˇnová Institute of Industrial Engineering and Management Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava Slovakia Natália Horˇnáková Institute of Industrial Engineering and Management Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava Slovakia ISSN 2522-8595 ISSN 2522-8609 (electronic) EAI/Springer Innovations in Communication and Computing ISBN 978-3-030-30910-7 ISBN 978-3-030-30911-4 (eBook) © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020 This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved by the Publisher, whether the whole or part of the material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, reuse of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilms or in any other physical way, and transmission or information storage and retrieval, electronic adaptation, computer software, or by similar or dissimilar methodology now known or hereafter developed. The use of general descriptive names, registered names, trademarks, service marks, etc. in this publication does not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the relevant protective laws and regulations and therefore free for general use. The publisher, the authors, and the editors are safe to assume that the advice and information in this book are believed to be true and accurate at the date of publication. Neither the publisher nor the authors or the editors give a warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the material contained herein or for any errors or omissions that may have been made. The publisher remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. This Springer imprint is published by the registered company Springer Nature Switzerland AG. The registered company address is: Gewerbestrasse 11, 6330 Cham, Switzerland Preface This scientific monograph consists of 38 cutting-edge and insightful research chapters dealing with the topic of innovation in various points of view. The authors are individuals as researchers, developers, and practitioners from all around the world, all of whom share a common interest in the area of innovation with focus on mobility in IoT. The editors would like to express their sincere thanks to the authors who have contributed with their knowledge and latest research to the creation of the scientific monograph. Trnava, Slovakia Dagmar Cagáˇnová Natália Horˇnáková v Contents FMWare: IoT-Based Fleet Management System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrick Flinner, Jungsoo Lim, Russell Abbott, Sammy Urbina, and Mohammed Al Rawi 1 Communication Management in Multiclient System Using SMS Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Pistek and Martin Hudec 17 Software-Defined Networking for Smart Buildings: Advances and Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zoubir Mammeri and Muhammad U. Younus 31 Performance Comparison of Zoning Techniques in Geographic Forwarding Rules for Ad Hoc Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mohammed Souidi and Ahmed Habbani 43 State of the Art and Challenges of Robotics in Slovak Republic. . . . . . . . . . . . Miroslav Balog, L’ubica Kotorová Slušná, and Jozef Herˇcko Use of Modern Technologies at Baggage Tracking and Its Impact on Airline Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matúš Bozogáˇn and Soˇna Hurná 55 73 Testbed on IT Communication in Smart Grid: A Cybersecurity Demonstration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Yannis Soupionis, Nikoleta Andreadou, and Thierry Benoist The Platform for Production Capacity Exchange Management as a Support for Implementation of the Industry 4.0 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Sebastian Saniuk Bike Sharing: As Urban Transport Solution in a Small City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Mária Holienˇcinová, Zdenka Kádeková, Tomáš Holota, and L’udmila Nagyová vii viii Contents Aspects Affecting Emission Production from Small Heat Sources . . . . . . . . . 153 Jozef Jandaˇcka and Michal Holubˇcík The Importance of Housing Companies in the Development of Sustainable Housing and Increase in Competitiveness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Janka Babelová and Jarmila Machajdikova Smart Surveillance Systems and Their Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Andrei Braicov, Ivan Budanaev, Marco Cosentino, Walter Matta, Alessandro Mattiacci, Carlo Maria Medaglia, and Mircea Petic Enhancing Resilience by Understanding Smart City and Safe City Concepts and Their Common Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Jozef Ristvej and Maroš Lacinák Industry 4.0: The Need for Rethink Strategic Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Anna Saniuk Intelligent Hardware-Software Platform for Efficient Coupling of Water-Energy Nexus in Smart Cities: A Conceptual Framework . . . . . . . 217 Naran Pindoriya, Markus Duchon, Pragya Kirti Gupta, Venkatesh Pampana, S. N. Singh, Jakob Giza, Bastian Hackenberg, Arvind Kumar Rajput, and Janki Jethi Scheduling Heuristic to Satisfy Due Dates of the Customer Orders in Mass Customized Service Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 R. Sudhakara Pandian, V. Modrak, Z. Soltysova, and P. Semanco Possibility of Accelerating Power Signal Calculation in a System of Internet of Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 O. N. Choporov, A. P. Preobrazhenskiy, and I. Ya. Lvovich Concept of the Factories of the Future in Slovak Industrial Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Jozef Hercko, Miroslav Fusko, and Lubica Kotorova Slusna Development of Employee Extent Commitment in Innovation Processes in Slovak Organisations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Zdenko Stacho, Katarína Stachová, and Dagmar Cagáˇnová The Smart Logistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 Richard Jurenka, Dagmar Cagáˇnová, and Natália Horˇnáková Identifying Points of Interest and Similar Individuals from Raw GPS Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Thiago Andrade and João Gama Cooperation Models for Employee Education: Analysis on Slovak and Czech Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Lucia Kohnová, Ján Papula, and Zuzana Papulová Contents ix The Effect of Bankruptcy on the Intangible Asset Valuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 Miriam Šefˇcíková, Dagmar Cagáˇnová, and Richard Jurenka EDGE4ALL: Edge Computing for Smart City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Ricardo Martins, Henrique Santos, Sérgio Lopes, Aníbal Leite, Álvaro Matos, and Paulo Cunha Simulator for Smart City Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349 Ricardo Martins, Henrique Santos, Aníbal Leite, Álvaro Matos, and Paulo Cunha Evaluation of Parking Policy in Bratislava in the Context of Economic Growth and Automotive Transport Development in Slovakia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 Julius Golej and Daniela Spirkova Rediscovering Urban Smart Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Mauro Romanelli Moving Towards Network State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 Marcel Ševela Are Home-Based Businesses New Trends in Working Environment for Youth and Senior Entrepreneurs in Europe? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Anna Pilkova and Marian Holienka Smart Solutions for Big/Small Cities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 Michal Balog, Angelina Iakovets, and Lucia Knapcikova Digital Transformation in the Healthcare Sector: Empirical Evidences of IoHT Benefits and Limits on Chronic Disease Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 Gabriele Palozzi, Daniele Binci, and Irene Schettini Cost Analysis of Telemedicine Implementation in the Lens of Healthcare Sustainability: A Review of the Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 Gabriele Palozzi, Antonio Chirico, and Francesco Gabbrielli How Millennials Will Use Autonomous Vehicles: An Interview Study . . . . . 471 Christina Pakusch, Gunnar Stevens, and Dirk Schreiber Smart Collaborative Learning Environment for Visually Impaired Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 485 Ruhiyati Idayu Abu Talib, Predrag K. Nikolic, Mohd Shahrizal Sunar, and Rui Prada Building an Ecosystem to Support Social Mobility for Person with Disabilities (PWDs): Malaysia Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 Ruhiyati Idayu Abu Talib, Mohd Shahrizal Sunar, Predrag K. Nikolic, and Ruzimi Mohamed x Contents Migration and Diversity Potentials for the Labour Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507 Petia Genkova Gender Differences in the Income of Employees Over 50 with Emphasis on Various Sectors of Economy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 Jana Stávková, Nad’a Hazuchová, Hana Porkertová, and Martina Rašticová Analytic Network Process as a Tool of Innovative Management at Manufacturing Technology Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539 Peter Monka, Katarina Monkova, Andrej Andrej, Jozef Tkac, Vladimir Duchek, Milan Edl, and Helena Zidkova Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 549 FMWare: IoT-Based Fleet Management System Patrick Flinner, Jungsoo Lim, Russell Abbott, Sammy Urbina, and Mohammed Al Rawi 1 Introduction In this paper, we discuss an Internet of Things (IoT)-based fleet management system, named FMWare. Because FMWare is built with open-source software and hardware, its cost is quite modest. Current industry solutions come with monthly subscription fees or pay-as-you-go charges; FMWare has neither. In addition, FMWare is highly customizable and extendable. The Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation oversees over 70,000 acres and manages 182 parks across all of Los Angeles County [2]. To cover this vast area, the County utilizes over 600 vehicles. Currently, these vehicles are managed by a paper-based system. Each time a County employee uses a County vehicle, the employee must fill in a paper form. This form consists of numerous fields such as purpose of trip, mileage of the car, gas level, etc. This paper-based process is time consuming for both drivers and service personnel. The current system also makes monitoring the usages of vehicles and scheduling maintenance service extremely difficult. The inability to perform maintenance in a timely manner leads to safety issues for drivers, as well as misallocation of County resources. In addition, the paper-based system provides no way to detect unauthorized use of vehicles. P. Flinner · J. Lim () · R. Abbott Department of Computer Science, California State University, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA e-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected] S. Urbina · M. Al Rawi Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation, Alhambra, CA, USA e-mail: [email protected]; [email protected] © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020 D. Cagáˇnová, N. Horˇnáková (eds.), Mobility Internet of Things 2018, EAI/Springer Innovations in Communication and Computing, 1 2 P. Flinner et al. All current industry solutions for fleet management require hefty monthly subscription fees ranging from $50 to $150, as well as an initial device charge [4, 7, 13]. These devices are built to be company specific and cannot be used outside their own company’s services. Were the County to opt to change to a different service provider, it would have to purchase a new set of devices. Also, the cost of tailoring the service to suit County needs is prohibitively expensive. As an alternative, we developed FMWare, an IoT-based Fleet Management System. FMWare eliminates the current paper form process and allows County employees expedited use of County vehicles. Driver information is collected through the use of the County’s employee badge system. To use a vehicle, drivers must scan their badge on a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) reader, which is attached to the FMWare Edge device installed in each vehicle. The badge reader collects and stores the employee ID. While the vehicle is in motion, FMWare collects Global Positioning System (GPS) data and vehicle diagnostics data, including mileage, gas level, and diagnostics trouble codes (DTCs). When a vehicle returns to base, the data stored on the FMWare device is uploaded to County servers through secure wireless gateways which are accessible in County parking lots. Data collected from the FMWare Edge Device is uploaded via Apache’s open-source data flow control software, NiFi and MiNiFi. FMWare monitors vehicle operation in near real-time, which facilitates identification of unauthorized vehicle use in a timely manner. FMWare can assist with effective scheduling of preventive maintenance and regular service for vehicles. Hence, staff safety is enhanced while reducing operating costs. The FMWare Edge device is composed of a single-board computer, a Global Positioning System (GPS) module, an RFID reader, an on-board diagnostics (OBD) adapter, a Liquid-Crystal Display (LCD) screen, and our power supply unit (PSU). Our PSU is composed of a buck converter and two 2 A fuses. The device records the diagnostic information retrieved from the vehicle’s OBD system through IEEE 802.15.4 WPAN for communication. The GPS module is used to collect route data. Upon the vehicle’s return to a County parking lot, the FMWare Edge device transmits the stored data through secure wireless access points available within County parking lots. The data that is uploaded to County servers can be subsequently viewed on our web application by managers. In summary, we show the feasibility of using IoT technology by implementing an affordable and easily customizable fleet management system, design and implement a fleet management system to remotely collect vehicle diagnostic data and vehicle operating data, and present an affordable IoT-based fleet management system for monitoring and managing a large number of vehicles. FMWare: IoT-Based Fleet Management System 3 2 Related Work Penna et al. developed an IoT-based fleet monitoring system mainly to monitor fuel consumption and to optimize fuel usages [8]. They installed a stainless steel (SS) pin fuel sensor to the vehicle to collect the level of fuel. The traveled distance was computed by using GPS based odometer. The collected fuel level data was uploaded to the server through a cellular network. Since the authors were only relying on fuel level sensors and GPS based odometer, detecting issues with a vehicle is not feasible. A fleet management system using vehicle tracker, named Rad100 was designed and implemented by Saghaei [10]. Rad100 is a self-contained portable unit which consists of a micro-controller, GPS module, motion detection sensor, and a cellular communication module. The main functionality of Rad100 is to find a vehicle’s location. When a vehicle is moving, the GPS data from Rad100 is sent to the back-end server through a cellular network and the location of the vehicle can be monitored. Although Rad100 can assist to recover a stolen vehicle, it is not capable of detecting any issues with the vehicles. A solution for fleet management using pre-fabricated modules was presented by Istrefi et al. [6]. The author used various pre-built factory modules including GPS modules, collision prevention assist modules, and cell...
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