The Crisis of the Election of 1876 and the Subsequent Compromise of 1877 and Their Effects Upon 19th - Call G Coddington Coddington 1 Mr Beaudoin AP U.S

The Crisis of the Election of 1876 and the Subsequent Compromise of 1877 and Their Effects Upon 19th

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Call G. Coddington Coddington 1Mr. BeaudoinAP U.S. History7 January 2010The Crisis of the Election of 1876 and the Subsequent Compromise of 1877 and TheirEffects Upon 19thCentury PoliticsWith the tension-filled years of Reconstruction of the South drawing to a reluctant end, both men of the North and the South were prepared to move on together as a united American nation. Although Lincoln’s plan for Reconstruction of the South was extensively muddled by President Andrew Johnson and it eventually fell through with hispreposterous political methods, the North and the South found themselves willingly motivated toward the idea of redemption for each other and of forgiveness over the Civil War. As the Election of 1876 drew closer, two promising candidates were appointed by the previously warring Republican and Democratic parties to take upon the burden of spurring forward a young and promising nation. With both Republican Rutherford B. Hayes’s and Democrat Samuel J. Tilden’s adherence to moral conformity and apparent resistance toward corrupt politics, the presidential run had the potential to further unite the U.S.’s two main political parties in its unbiased connotations. However, America soon realized that the Republicans and Democrats each wouldn’t give up the presidency to the other without a deceitful fight. This Election of 1876 proved to be one of the most corrupt elections in the history of the United States. With Tilden winning the popular vote over Hayes in the onset by 3%,
Coddington 2one could see that the electoral votes coming in from the states were to be pivotal to the final decision of the presidency. Surely seeing this as a manipulative point, the Republicans challenged all 19 electoral votes from the states of South Carolina, Florida and Louisiana, hoping to reverse the popular view as Tilden for president. Refuting thesevotes would certainly give Hayes a reliable step-up into the presidential position, and Tilden would be stolen of his one electoral vote needed to win, an additional fact that the Democrats used to their advantage, as well; however, not on the scale of 19 votes but only one. Understanding this, the Democrats responded with a challenge to the integrity

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