12.4 Point counter economic lens.docx - Identify each...

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Identify each statement about the Sherman source as either true or false. Statement True False General Sherman’s account of the effects of the Union army’s foraging efforts should suffice to complete an assessment of the Confederate perspective on the economic consequences of the war. Sherman’s firsthand knowledge of the organizational structure of the foraging companies offers valuable insight into this Union strategy. Given Sherman’s rank as general, his recollection of the logistics of the foraging expeditions provides compelling evidence of their tactical intent. Explanation: Originally published just ten years after the end of the Civil War, the Memoirs of General William T. Sherman offer the perspective of a powerful Union military figure whose side emerged victorious from the conflict. A valuable primary source created by an author whose hand shaped and guided tactical operations that significantly weakened the Confederacy, Sherman’s memoir provides important details regarding the scope of the foraging expeditions that decimated an already battered southern economy and bolstered the northern forces as they marched to the sea. However, because this source is a memoir (an autobiographical account of an author’s experiences) drafted upon reflection and ten years’ hindsight, you must bear the following in mind as you analyze it. Sherman’s memoir, like most, provides a careful selection of events chosen to enhance the author’s legacy and with an eye toward its preservation for posterity. To be sure, Sherman’s subjective rendering provides critical insight into the machinations of the Union army’s foraging expeditions, such as the personnel, procurements, and logistics of these enterprises, and it acknowledges that "exceptional and incidental" acts of blatant robbery did, indeed, occur peripherally while the expeditions advanced the strategic interests of the Union army. However, it is well to note that Sherman cites the foraging expeditions as "necessary," as "indispensable to [the Union’s] success" and as having precedent in previous European wars. These final assertions reflect the bias and perspective of a historical figure whose actions bore fruit, but they must be judged only as evidence to contextualize Sherman’s view on the events surrounding his march to the sea. Points: 1 / 1 Close Explanation
Which acts does Sherman admit that ”bummers” perpetrated against the people of the plantations and farms they visited? Check all that apply.
Violence Robbery Pillage Points: 1 / 1 Close Explanation

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