Poetic_devices_and_terms_ - Rhetorical Devices in Poetry Rhetorical Device Alliteration Allusion Antithesis Apostrophe Assonance Cacophony Caesura

Poetic_devices_and_terms_ - Rhetorical Devices in Poetry...

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Rhetorical Devices in Poetry Rhetorical Device Definition Example Alliteration the recurrence of initial consonant sounds Stephen sat on seven silly snakes. Allusion a short, informal reference to a famous person or event If Einstein were in my position, what would he do? Antithesis establishes a clear, contrasting relationship between two ideas by joining them together or juxtaposing them You are easy on the eyes, but hard on the heart. Apostrophe In literature, apostrophe is a figure of speech sometimes represented by exclamation “O”. A writer or a speaker, using an apostrophe, detaches himself from the reality and addresses an imaginary character in his speech. “Death be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for, thou art not so, For, those, whom thou think’st, thou dost overthrow, Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.” -“Death Be Not Proud” John Donne Assonance similar vowel sounds repeated in successive or proximate words containing different consonants I feel depressed and restless. Cacophony the use of words and phrases that imply strong, harsh sounds within the phrase His fingers rapped and pounded the door, and his foot thumped against the yellowing wood Caesura creating a fracture of sorts within a sentence where the two separate parts are distinguishable from one another yet intrinsically linked to one another Mozart- oh how your music makes me soar! Colloquialism a word or phrase that is not formal or literary and is used in ordinary or familiar conversation Hey man, how’s it going? Conceit an ingenious or fanciful comparison or metaphor All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances Consonance repetition of the same consonant or consonant pattern two or more times in short succession He struck a streak of bad luck. Diction the distinctive tone or tenor of an author’s writings, including mood, attitude, dialect, and style of writing Certain writers in the modern day and age use archaic terms such as ‘thy’, ‘thee’ and ‘wherefore’ to imbue a Shakespearean mood to their work. End-Stopped An end-stop occurs when a line of poetry ends with a period or “Bright Star, would I were as stedfast as thou art—
Rhetorical Devices in Poetry definite punctuation mark, such as a colon Not in lone splendor hung aloft the night, And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite,” -“Bright Star”, John Keats Enjambment occurs when a phrase carries over a line-break without a major pause “Or gazing on the new soft-fallen masque Of snow upon the mountains and the moors—“ -“Bright Star”, John Keats Euphony the use of phrases and words

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