19.docx - vestibular or extrinopsychic In primate brains,...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

vestibular or extrinopsychicIn primate brains, most of the geniculate fibres go to Area 17, the striate area. In close anatomical proximity toone another and to area 17, the two other areas that have neurons that bind to the eye are parastriate andperistriate areas (or Brodmann areas 18 and 19), respectively. In layman's terms, these areas are referred to as"secondary visual areas" because signals from area 17 to area 18 and from area 18 to area 19 relay informationto regions outside of the ones they're in. This explains why these circumstriate areas are involved in relayingvisual information to other parts of the brain. As such, visual input flows to the frontal cortex as the eyes directthe movements of the fingers, which are regulated by a frontal region of the brain. Due to bilateral destruction ofthe areas, this acquired visual discrimination cannot be recovered once it is lost in the monkey. This area of thebrain is believed to affect orientation in space and stereoscopic vision in humans.the process of complete integration of the retinaFor vision to be registered by the brain, the two halves of the retina (corresponding to the two hemispheres ofthe visual field) must be represented on opposite cerebral hemispheres. But since vision is experienced as aunified entity, one would expect a strong link between the two visual cortical areas.Gain an in-depth understanding!entire corpus callosumThe interhemispheric commissural (or commissural bridge) that connects the two hemispheres of the brain, andthat is made up of neurons and their axons and dendrites that form synapses with cortical neurons on the two

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 3 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
N/A
Tags
University of California, Lateral geniculate nucleus

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture