Humanitarian Interventions and Failed States- Differing Perspectives

Humanitarian Interventions and Failed States- Differing Perspectives

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Humanitarian Interventions & Failed States: Differing Perspectives Krasner’s Perspective… Krasner’s analysis of the failed or weak state problematic in international relations revolves around the failure of weak states to govern effectively. He also stresses the transnational impacts of contemporary failed states: WMD, disease, crime, and desire to intervene to stop genocide (especially in liberal democracies). He stresses that the two main policy tools available to states wishing to intervene – governance assistance and transitional administration – are not up to the task. He offers two possible correctives for external actors: de facto trusteeship and shared sovereignty contracts. Krasner’s Perspective… The key here is that the problem is internal to the failed state; the solution is improving domestic governance structures. The Jones and Chowdhury articles are critical of this framing of the problem; in fact they critique the idea of the ‘problem’ itself. Sovereignty: Krasner’s article begins with a discussion of conventional sovereignty. It has 3 components: international legal sovereignty; Westaphalian/Vatellian sovereignty; and domestic sovereignty. Krasner’s Perspective… Basically: 1. Recognition of juridically independent entities. 2. Non-intervention in domestic affairs of other states. 3. The capacity of domestic authority structures to ensure peace, prosperity and rule of law based on shared conceptions of justice. The problem in relation to failed states is that domestic sovereignty (#3) has faltered badly. This is a problem because honoring #1 & #2 means external actors can’t do anything about #3.
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He argues we need new institutional forms to secure #3 in failed states. Krasner’s Perspective… He lists a number of problems associated with failing states: deteriorating infrastructure, corruption, unregulated border, declining GDP, rampant crime and a national currency which is not widely accepted.
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