Argumentative Analysis - KaisenYao Yao1 Writing1,Section52 Beales October29,2012 ShadowingtheTruth Forcenturies, assumption,

Argumentative Analysis - KaisenYao Yao1 Writing1,Section52...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Kaisen Yao Yao 1 Writing 1, Section 52 Beales October 29, 2012       Shadowing the Truth For centuries, humans believed that the Earth was the center of the universe.   Early astronomers structured their scientific experiments and discoveries around this  assumption, creating many intricate geocentric planetary models, which were thought to  be correct.  It wasn’t until the 16 th  century, when Copernicus questioned the Ptolemaic  system, experimented, and presented the heliocentric model with scientific evidence.  It  took so long to figure out the heliocentricity of our solar system because psychologically, our human minds have blocked out that possibility after assuming the geocentric model.   Emily Martin pointed out a similar issue, while researching the masculine figurative  language used in describing the human fertilization process.  David Freedman’s essay,  The Aggressive Egg,  utilizes controversial imagery and a foreshadowing thesis in the  introduction, a mild tone, and multiple external viewpoints to emphasize the author’s  point that the commonly used masculine metaphor for fertilization is not the central issue, but rather, it is a microcosmic example of how distorted figurative language can slow  down the rate of scientific development.   First, Freedman opens his argument with a descriptive, feminine perspective on  the fertilization process.  His first words, “Ah, fertilization” (641), start the essay off with a simple, yet relieving tone, as if it had taken him a long time to finally talk 
Image of page 1
Yao 2 about this topic.  By doing so, he sets up the scene for the imagery about to follow,  making it seem dramatic and intensely important.  However, Freedman suddenly throws  his readers a curveball by reviewing the process that we have been taught in school for so long.  His imagery of sperm paints an awkward picture in our minds by using key words  and phrases such as “wastefully”, “weakly flops along”, “flailing aimlessly”, and  “through sheer odds” (641), striking confusion in our minds and making us question how  the fertilization process really works.  Freedman’s first sign of his agreement with Emily  Martin appears in this introduction, when he asks the rhetorical question, “Or would you  have put it differently?” (641), and later contrasts his first image with the incorrect image,
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Fall '09
  • Writing, Freedman, David Freedman

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture