Rhetorical Analysis - KaisenYao Yao1 Writing1,Section52...

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Kaisen Yao Yao 1 Writing 1, Section 52 Beales October 15, 2012       Yin Yang The concept of Yin Yang deals with polar opposites, somehow collaborating and  depending on each other.  The best example is a love-hate relationship.  Some people  have a love-hate relationship with their best friend, and in the end, everything works out  and they are still best friends.  A similar theme of love-hate dualism appears in the  “Sounds” chapter of  Walden,  when Henry David Thoreau uses metaphors, detailed  imagery, and allusions to show that although the train annoys him, he loves its power and punctuality.    Initially, Thoreau’s hatred for the train is given away by the context of the  passage and his ranting.  At first, Thoreau appears to be disgusted by the train.   Considering the fact that he has buried himself in the middle of nature in order to escape  civilization, it seems logical that he “will not have my eyes put out and my ears spoiled  by its smoke and steam and hissing” (Thoreau 116).  Thoreau claims that he views the  train as a nuisance, and that its frequent appearance by Walden Pond ruins the natural  setting.  In fact, Thoreau even speaks for the fish in the pond, saying: “now that the cars  are gone by and all the restless world with them, and the  fishes in the pond no longer feel their rumbling” (Thoreau 116).  Thoreau tries to use the  fishes’ views to support the fact that the train is an interruption to the serene atmosphere 
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of Walden Pond.  He even claims that the train has no productive purpose whatsoever, by saying: “if the cloud that hangs over the engine were the  Yao 2 perspiration of heroic deeds, or as beneficent as that which floats over the farmer’s fields, then the elements and Nature herself would cheerfully accompany men on their errands  and be their escort” (Thoreau 110).  This quote shows Thoreau clearly stating his  argument:  that the train has gives no benefit to society at all, and that Nature should not  be used for creating such wasteful objects.  This passage makes it seem like Thoreau is 
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