Syllabus - RHE 309S Critical Reading and Persuasive Writing...

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RHE 309S, Critical Reading and Persuasive Writing Instructor: Cleve Wiese Unique number: 44345 Class Time and Place: T/TH 12:30-2:00 in FAC 7 E-mail: [email protected] Course Website: Blackboard Office: PAR 3 W 10-1 and Office hours: Wednesday 10:00-11:30, Friday 12:30-2:00, and by appointment RHE 309S is designed for students who have earned credit by examination for RHE 306 – Rhetoric & Writing. Like RHE 306, RHE 309S teaches students how to analyze and write arguments, but it also introduces you to rhetoric as a civic art, one that prepares you to write to and for the public. RHE 309S is designated a writing flag course. This section will focus on reading and writing arguments in the American public sphere. Students will have wide latitude to tailor topics to their own interests, but over the course of the semester they will all learn and apply the persuasive and analytical tools of ancient rhetoric in their writing and research. Students will learn skills such as how to: Analyze issues and arguments, and the rhetorical situations (or public spheres) in which they are embedded Understand public writing Read texts and images critically Discover, evaluate, construct, and organize effective, original arguments Conduct research, use it effectively in argumentation, and document sources properly Produce a clear and supple style that is adapted to particular rhetorical situations Edit and proofread their own and others’ prose Main Texts Ancient Rhetorics , Sharon Crowley and Debra Hawhee Brief Penguin Handbook , Lester Faigley Grading You will be graded on the following assignments this term: Paper 1.1 5% Paper 1.2 15% Paper 2.1 15% Paper 2.2 15% Paper 3.1 15% Paper 3.2 Optional – replaces 3.1 grade RS 1&2, Annotated Bib., and RA 1 15% Progymnasmata, quizzes,etc. (other short, p/f assigments) 10% Declamation 10%
Peer reviews Mandatory Participation Invaluable Plus/Minus Grading Grades for individual assignments will be on a 100-­૒pt. scale. Final grades will use a +-­૒ system on the following scale: A = 94-­૒100 A-­૒ = 90-­૒93 B+ = 87-­૒89 B = 84-­૒86 B-­૒ = 80-­૒83 C+ = 77-­૒79 C = 74-­૒76 C-­૒ = 70-­૒73 D+ = 67-­૒69 D = 64-­૒66 D-­૒ = 60-­૒63 F = 0-­૒60 Major Assignments Students will write three essays ranging from 4-­૒7 pages each (above designated as 1.1, 2.1, and 3.1), and they will revise each of these three based on the instructor’s feedback (above designated as 1.2, 2.2, and 3.2 – essay 3.2 is optional). In addition, students will compose four shorter writing assignments (two research summaries, one annoated bibliography, and one rhetorical analysis) as well as six very short writing assignments modeled after the ancient progymnasmata. Paper Submission Guidelines and Late Work Policy All written work must be both emailed as a .DOC or .DOCX attachment to [email protected] AND printed and turned in at the beginning of the designated class day (progymnasmata should be posted on Blackboard by 5pm the night before class and printed out for the following day).

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