Final Essay; Research paper - H o l l i n s |1 Drekal...

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H o l l i n s | 1Drekal HollinsJon Dittman English 200April 17, 2013Title IX: Does Sex Discrimination Exist in Sports, today?Before there was a Lisa Leslie, Candace Parker, and now Brittney Griner, women had very little opportunities to participate in sports. Women had to take a back seat to their male counterparts, until one day the doors opened up for women. In 1972, the United States Department of Education passed the education amendment called Title IX. It was created to protect people from discrimination based on sex in education programs or activities. Title IX was women’s breakthrough to compete beside the men on all levelsin sports. According, to the Chanan Tigay, editor of the article, “Women and Sports: Do schools give female athletes enough opportunities?” “More than 3 million girls now play on high-school teams, and some 9,100 women's college teams compete at the varsity level (Tigay).” Although, the existence of Title IX may have been the vast opening of equity in sports, the topics stills pertains controversy. Some argue it lessen males opportunities to assist women. On the other hand, proponents debate that opportunities for women still lag behind the males. This bring us to the question, does sex discrimination still exist in sports? I believe the answer to this question is YES. Women make up the majority of undergraduates in higher education, but they are still underrepresented among college athletes. Researcher John Cheslock states in his journal “Who’s Playing College Sports,” “At the average higher education institution, the female share of undergraduates is 55.8% while the female share of athletes is 41.7%. Women didenjoy a substantial increase in participation opportunities in the late 1990s, but this
H o l l i n s | 2progress slowed considerably in the early 2000s (Cheslock 3).” What are the causes for this slowed progress to women participating in sports? Given the recent concerns of sex discrimination in athletics, financial issues are the most noticeable discriminatory act in women sports. Curtis Eichelberger discusses thepoint at question in his article, “Women Basketball Programs Lose Money as Salaries Break College Budgets.” According to Eichelberger from the year 2010, “Across the U.S., the most popular women’s college sport is in the red. Women’s basketball at the 53 public schools in the six largest conferences recorded operating losses last fiscal year of $109.7 million, while the men’s teams had operating profits of $240 million, according to

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