Lecture 7 Threats to Wildlife II.pdf - Lecture 7 Threats to...

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Lecture 7 Threats to Wildlife IILearning ObjectivesBe able to:1.Describe the magnitude of mortality figures for mammals (roadkill) whereavailable.2.Describe the effect of plastics on seabird mortality, and explain how youwould generate a curve that estimates the likelihood of mortality fromingesting a certain number of plastic items.3.Identify the major causes of mortality for birds and describe their relativemagnitude.4.Explain and discuss how testing of “bird-safe” windows is conducted.5.Identify what variables are important for estimating the number of birdslost due to different activities, and use those variables to generateestimates of birds lost.6.Explain why bats are particularly vulnerable to wind turbines.Threats to wildlife -- “accidental” anthropogenic mortality-Using quotation marks around accidentals as there are things that can bedone to prevent these deaths.-This is not an accident, it is negligenceCategorizing the Threats to Wildlife-This chart shown above is breaking down all the different threats to wildlife-Is more in depth-Ex. breaks down habitat loss into what is contributing to habitat loss-Human disturbances, which includes habitat loss, samae withenergy production and urban development and systemmodifications such as dams/fire suppression may make habitat lessviable (degrade habitat), etc.
AG = AgricultureGE = Geological events (catastrophes)OE = OverexploitationID = Invasive species/diseasePO = PollutionCC = Climate changeTR = Transportation corridors-Related to today’s lecSM = System modification (dams/fire suppression)UD = Urban developmentEP = Energy production-Related to today’s lecHD = Human disturbances (including habitat loss)This image is for 132 of Canada’s assessed species.The graph is a lot more detailed than you would typically see.Many categories, like system modification, transportation, or energy productionare often categorized under Human disturbances.-Overexploitation is one of the largest threats leading to habitat loss-Most important categoryThe Available Data Have Some ShortcomingsThe extent of the threats for some species have been more thoroughly assessedthan for others (birds better than other groups)-Birds are typically better assessed than other groups as they receive moreattention-This is one issue where we may not necessarily know the most significantthreat for some species we have studied lessSome emerging threats, such as plastics, still have limited data available-As shown in picture on right, and tangling in fishing gear/bycatch still haslimited data-There are only a few studies looking at plast and its effect on mortality ofsea animals
Accidental Mortality by Automobile CollisionsFor whatever reason, the data for birds seems to be more comprehensive thanthe data for mammals-Mammals like the white-tailed deer are bigger than birds, and so it shouldbe easy to find dead mammals and then understand what killed them-

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Term
Winter
Professor
Petri
Tags
mortality

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