Chapter 20 USH Notes (Sanderson) - Chapter 20 The New Frontier and the Great Society Chapter 20.1 Kennedy and the Cold War The Election of 1960 The

Chapter 20 USH Notes (Sanderson) - Chapter 20 The New...

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Chapter 20: The New Frontier and the Great Society Chapter 20.1: Kennedy and the Cold War The Election of 1960 The Televised Debate Affects Votes Kennedy had a well-organized campaign and the backing of his wealthy, and was handsome and charismatic  many felt that he was too inexperienced Americans also worried that having a Roman Catholic in the White House would lead either to influence of the pope on American policies or to closer ties between church and state  Kennedy was able to allay worries by discussing the issue openly Kennedy and Nixon took part in the first televised debate between presidential candidates  on September 26, 1960, 70 million TV viewers watched the two articulate and knowledgeable candidates debating issues  Nixon, an expert on foreign policy, had agreed to the forum in hopes of exposing Kennedy’s inexperience. However, Kennedy had been coached by television producers and he spoke better than Nixon Kennedy’s success in the debate launched a new era in American politics: the television age Kennedy and Civil Rights Police in Atlanta, Georgia arrested the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. and 33 other African-American demonstrators for sitting at a segregated lunch counter  Although the other demonstrators were released, Kind was sentences to months of hard labor – officially for a minor traffic violation  the Eisenhower administration refused to intervene, and Nixon took no public position Kennedy telephoned King’s wife to express his sympathy  Meanwhile, Robert Kennedy (John’s brother and campaign manager) persuaded the judge who had sentenced King to release the civil rights leader on bail, pending appeal  News of the incident captured the immediate attention of the African American community, whose votes would help Kennedy carry key states in the Midwest and South The Camelot Years The election in November 1960 was the closest since 1884  Kennedy won by fewer than 119,000 votes The Kennedy Mystique Critics argued that his smooth style lacked substance Newspapers and magazines filled their pages with pictures and stories about the president’s young daughter Caroline and his infant son John With JFK’s youthful glamour and his talented advisors, the Kennedy White House reminded many of a modern-day Camelot, the mythical court of King Arthur The Best and Brightest Kennedy surrounded himself with a team of advisors that one journalist called “the best and the brightest”  they included: McGeorge Bundy (a Harvard University dean) as national security advisor; Robert McNamara (president of Ford Motor Company) as secretary of defense; and Dean Rusk (president of the Rockefeller Foundation) as secretary of state Of all the advisors, Kennedy relied most heavily on his brother Robert, whom he appointed attorney general A New Military Policy
Third world: during the Cold War, the developing nations not allied with either the US or the Soviet Union

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