Phil1October 19

Phil1October 19 - October 19, 2007 1) JTB Analysis a. The...

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October 19, 2007 1) JTB Analysis a. The JTB analysis of knowledge has the logical form of a biconditional (ie: any statement of the form P if and only if Q) i. The only way for a conditional to be false is if the antecedent is true but the consequent is false ii. Why? Because every conditional just “says” that its antecedent is sufficient for its consequent and that its consequent is necessary for its antecedent. iii. So a counterexample to a conditional statement (if P, then Q) will be of the form P but Not Q. iv. A biconditional is two conjoined conditionals; such that, for any statement of the form P if and only if Q to be true, it must be true that both conditionals i and ii are true: 1. i. If P, then Q 2. ii: if Q, then P v. So, a counterexample to any biconditional statement (P iff Q) will be of either these two forms 1. i. P but Not Q or 2. ii. Q but Not P 2) A closer look at the JTB analysis a. Since the JTB analysis is a biconditional, for it to be true both of its two conditionals, i and ii, must be true
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Phil1October 19 - October 19, 2007 1) JTB Analysis a. The...

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